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A Wrinkle in Time Paperback – Jul 1994


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Product details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Yearling Books; Reissue edition (July 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440498058
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440498056
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.6 x 19.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 976,983 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Amazon Review

Everyone in town thinks Meg Murry is volatile and dull-witted, and that her younger brother, Charles Wallace, is dumb. People are also saying that their physicist father has run off and left their brilliant scientist mother. Spurred on by these rumours and an unearthly stranger, the tesseract- touting Mrs Whatsit, Meg and Charles Wallace and their new friend Calvin O'Keefe embark on a perilous quest through space to find their father. In doing so, they must travel behind the shadow of an evil power that is darkening the cosmos, one planet at a time. This is no superhero tale, nor is it science fiction, although it shares elements of both. The travellers must rely on their individual and collective strengths, delving deep within themselves to find answers.

A well-loved classic and 1963 Newbery Medal winner, Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time is sophisticated in concept yet warm in tone, with mystery and love coursing through its pages. Meg's shattering, yet ultimately freeing, discovery that her father is not omnipotent provides a satisfying coming-of-age element. Readers will feel a sense of power as they travel with these three children, challenging concepts of time, space and the triumph of good over evil. The companion books in the Time quartet, continuing the adventures of the Murry family, are A Wind in the Door; A Swiftly Tilting Planet, which won the American Book Award; and Many Waters. Every young reader should experience L'Engle's captivating, occasionally life-changing contributions to children's literature. (Ages 9 and older) --Emilie Coulter --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

'A well-loved classic and 1963 Newbery Medal winner, Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time is sophisticated in concept yet warm in tone, with mystery and love coursing through its pages. 'Emilie Coulter, Amazon --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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It was a dark and stormy night. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Daneman VINE VOICE on 18 Mar. 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a children's book, but it isn't just an adventure story.
It has science-fiction; The Drs. Murray, parents of Meg, Charles Wallace and the twins) are scientists who are researching Time and Space. Dr. Murray takes a time trip and so do the kids.
There is also magic; a trio of "witches" shows up--Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who and Mrs. Which, and they take Meg, her brother Charles-Wallace, and their new friend Calvin on an epic adventure.
It's also the story of a family with a deep trouble who nonetheless stay together, the story of a young girl who is just coming into adolescence with all the awkwardness and confusing feelings, and the story of a special little boy who is thought to be retarded by townspeople.
The symbology L'Engel uses is powerful and original; a giant brain who seduces those around it into surrendering their free will as an ultimate dictator; a shadow-like smog around planets that represents the presence of Evil, and a special young boy who is more than a genius; who is "something new" who nonetheless can be tempted to his own destruction by vanity.
Wrinkle in Time has a lot of fertile subjects for discussions between parents and children about good, evil, how we treat each other, and the choices we make. Ms. L'Engel often uses moral themes in her books and this one contains excellent subjects for discussions about kindness, good, evil, God, and being different, and about the destructiveness of gossip.
Wrinke in Time is like the Potter books in that it is about boys and girls in a magical or fantasy setting. It is unlike the Potter books because it does not focus on wizardry as a craft. Instead it presents the universe as full of wonder, and united by a titanic struggle of Good against Evil. Like the Potter books, there are sequels to Wrinkle in Time, and the story of the Murray kids continues. This was hands-down my favorite book as a child. I still have my copy almost 40 years later.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Chrestomanci VINE VOICE on 21 Jun. 2004
Format: Paperback
This book starts with possibly the worst opening sentence of all time: 'It was a dark and stormy night.' However, the story that follows is both original and charming.
Meg and her younger brother Charles Wallace go in search of their beloved missing father, whose experiments have left him trapped in a parallel dimension. With the help of three mysterious witch-like characters they tesser (travel through a wrinkle in time) to rescue him, but face many dangers and adventures along the way.
Both Meg and Charles Wallace are endearing multi-faceted characters. I especially like the fact they are considered to be below normal intelligence by the educational system, yet undoubtedly have much higher IQs than their teachers. Both show the rare insight and depth of understanding granted to few ... and recognised by even fewer. This is a wonderfully empowering message to young readers who are made to feel less than adequate at school. The writing style has a clarity and simplicity that makes it a pleasure to read. Recommended for readers aged 8 - 11.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Ang on 10 May 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Originally published in 1962, there is a timeless quality that makes this not-quite definable novel a YA/Children's classic. There are strong elements of fantasy and sci-fi, and the title is a reference to the author's concept of "tesseract" - not the hypercube in the geometric sense, but a way of travel that bends the space-time continuum.

Meg Murry is 14, and the oldest girl in a household of scientists, sports whizzes and geniuses, while she is less than average, and a bit of a social outcast. She is closest to her preternaturally precocious 5-year-old brother Charles Wallace, who seems to have the ability to read her mind. Her scientist father had mysteriously disappeared while working on the tesseract, and the neighbourhood is abuzz with rumours of his abandonment of the family. Enter an eccentric baglady, Mrs Whatsit, on a "dark and stormy night", and later a jock at school whom it turns out, shares kindred feelings of being a fellow misfit, Calvin O'Keefe, and the 3 children soon find themselves on a magical journey in search of Mr Murry.

Along the way, Meg learns that "like and equal are two different things" on the planet of Camaztoz, which they have tessered onto, with the help of Mrs Whatsit (much more than a baglady) and her two companions, Mrs Who and Mrs Which, where they are persuaded to accept the norm of uniformity. Perhaps the most sobering discovery for Meg is that when she does find her father, it is much less a happy occasion that she had expected: "She had found her father and he had not made everything all right. Everything kept getting worse and worse. If the long search for her father was ended, and he wasn't able to overcome all their difficulties, there was nothing to guarantee that it would all come out right in the end.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By eppingstrider on 22 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It says on the front cover ‘a masterpiece of science fiction’ and for a long time I wondered, as I felt the start was over-written, too flowery. Then I got well and truly drawn into the plot, and despite shades of 1984 and a few other alternate universe stories of the 1960s great SF writers, I concluded the cover was right. This is a masterpiece.

We find Meg Murry at school or home with her mother and brothers. At first it is hard to tell that the youngest brother is not an adult. He is strange, but this strangeness is something treasured by his parents and beautifully explained – as are Meg’s own foibles – as something he’ll grow into. I remembered one young friend of mine who similarly spoke in the most complete and grammatically perfect sentences from a very young age, and accepted Charlie Wallace (Meg’s brother) from then on.

Acceptance is one of the many themes in this book. Acceptance of who you are, and of people’s differences. As we follow Meg, Charlie Wallace and their friend Calvin to the planet of Camazotz in search of Meg’s father, we learn, as do they, that our differences are not only important to us, but also to our society, and even our world.

The book splits fairly evenly into two parts: understanding Meg at home with her mother and brothers, and the strangeness and mysteries in their lives, and the quest to find her father, through the Wrinkle in Time. There is a fair amount of science – from psychology through to quantum physics – in bite-sized chunks in this book, which I enjoyed. It’s not essential to enjoying the plot, but I reckon a good many young readers will enjoy it too. The ending is a little cliched nowadays, but it wouldn’t have been when the story was written.
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