Buy Used
Used - Good See details
Price: £1.48

or
 
   
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
I’d like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

A Philosophical Investigation [Paperback]

Philip Kerr
3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover --  
Paperback £9.99  
Paperback, 5 Aug 1993 --  

Book Description

5 Aug 1993
21st-century London is a world of elaborate technology, uncontained violence and sickening squalor, where serial killing has reached epidemic proportions. Chief Inspector Jakowicz needs all her powers of reason and intuition to stop a killer whose selection of victims threatens government security.

Frequently Bought Together

A Philosophical Investigation + Hitler's Peace: A Novel of the Second World War + Dark Matter: The Private Life of Sir Isaac Newton: A Novel
Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Arrow Books Ltd; New edition edition (5 Aug 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099178214
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099178217
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 2.4 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,938,902 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Philip Kerr was born in Edinburgh in 1956 and read Law at university. Having learned nothing as an undergraduate lawyer he stayed on as postgraduate and read Law and Philosophy, most of this German, which was when and where he first became interested in German twentieth century history and, in particular, the Nazis. Following university he worked as a copywriter at a number of advertising agencies, including Saatchi & Saatchi, during which time he wrote no advertising slogans of any note. He spent most of his time in advertising researching an idea he'd had for a novel about a Berlin-based policeman, in 1936. And following several trips to Germany - and a great deal of walking around the mean streets of Berlin - his first novel, March Violets, was published in 1989 and introduced the world to Bernie Gunther.
"I loved Berlin before the wall came down; I'm pretty fond of the place now, but back then it was perhaps the most atmospheric city on earth. Having a dark, not to say black sense of humour myself, it's always been somewhere I feel very comfortable."
Having left advertising behind, Kerr worked for the London Evening Standard and produced two more novels featuring Bernie Gunther: The Pale Criminal (1990) and A German Requiem (1991). These were published as an omnibus edition, Berlin Noir in 1992.
Thinking he might like to write something else, he did and published a host of other novels before returning to Bernie Gunther after a gap of sixteen years, with The One from the Other (2007).
Says Kerr, "I never intended to leave such a large gap between Book 3 and Book 4; a lot of other stuff just got in the way; and I feel kind of lucky that people are still as interested in this guy as I am. If anything I'm more interested in him now than I was back in the day."
Two more novels followed, A Quiet Flame (2008) and If the Dead Rise Not (2009).
Field Gray (2010) is perhaps his most ambitious novel yet that features Bernie Gunther. Crossing a span of more than twenty years, it takes Bernie from Cuba, to New York, to Landsberg Prison in Germany where he vividly describes a story that covers his time in Paris, Toulouse, Minsk, Konigsberg, and his life as a German POW in Soviet Russia.
Kerr is already working on an eighth title in the series.
"I don't know how long I can keep doing them; I'll probably write one too many; but I don't feel that's happened yet."
As P.B.Kerr Kerr is also the author of the popular 'Children of the Lamp' series.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
'THE UNFORTUNATE VICTIM, twenty-five-year-old Mary Woolnoth, was found naked in the basement of the offices of the Mylae Shipping Company in Jermyn Street, where she had worked for three years as a receptionist, her face beaten in with a claw hammer. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Kerr's futuristic police officer and police state may have seemed a bold vision of social change in the early 1990's when he was writing this novel, but there are aspects of it which have become chillingly realistic in recent years.
Kerr sets his work in the second decade of the 21st century. It is a Britain which has definitely gone hard on crime and hard on the causes of crime, with police routinely armed, long-term prisoners subjected to suspended, but conscious animation in a chemical induced coma, and the Lombroso project mapping the interior configuration of the human brain (not the bumps on the skull) to predict who is most likely to commit violent crime and therefore be in a position to offer pre-emptive treatment and surveillance.
Jake is a Chief Inspector, educated, urbane, feminist, and concerned with the murder of women. She is, however, diverted to the task of catching the man who seems to be serially killing those who have been identified as positive risks by Lombroso, a man who seems to have a sophisticated, if ironic, appreciation of philosophy ... and a very practical knowledge of computers.
What follows is a cerebral thriller in which the dissection of philosophical paradigms and the meaning of meaning within the mind of the killer become significant threads in the denouement of the novel. At times well-paced and gripping, at others somewhat overburdened by its philosophical nuances and allusions (not least in terms of occasional blocks of exposition which slow the flow), this remains a highly entertaining work ... though hardly light reading.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wholly and Completely Under-Rated 3 Mar 2008
By Anna
Format:Paperback
Curses! Foiled by the various publications. Just today, I recommended this book to a fellow reviewer, having reviewed it myself a year and half ago or so. To my consternation, I discovered I'd reviewed another (unknown) version... meanwhile this incredible book is being undeservedly lambasted right and left.

The version I read was given away with some mens' magazine. No clue how I got a hold of a copy, to be honest. But it was a good day. I always think it's slightly obnoxious when people review all the different versions of the same thing, with the same review. But to see such a wonderful book not have the support it so richly deserves is dreadful, so from here on, it'll be an updated (obnoxious) same review...

It's inexplicable to me that it was given away free with a magazine and *still* hardly anyone has read it. It's, essentially, a murder mystery, but it's so much more than that.

It is set in the near-ish future, where future-ness seamlessly blends with modernity to create an utterly believable society - one which, post 9/11 and 7/7, is becoming increasingly real as the days go by. It has *precisely* the right proportion of now-stuff, and what-will-be-stuff. Its descriptions are crisp, fresh, and clean, almost to the point where just by reading about that world you can breathe easier.

However, it's bordering on a dystopia - without the clichés - and the plot centres around a deeply intelligent, highly philosophical, oddly sympathetic killer. Much of the book is written in the 1st person from his (or her. Ha!) perspective and the reader is drawn in to this world absolutely.

Without giving too much away, this is less a whodunit, more a whydeydodatden? The story is inspired and intelligent; the execution of it is fantastic, and the fact that it's so under-rated is a tragedy. If you like your books well above par, this is the badger for you.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Philosophical Investigation 1 Feb 2009
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I first read this book in the early 90's when doing my philosophy degree and found it utterly mindblowing it is an intelligent crime thriller, not something you find a lot of! and Mr Kerr vision of the future is chilling and unfortunately too many aspects of his brave new world are coming to past. If you enjoy a book that forces you to think about the reasons why certain crimes are on the increase then I highly recomend this book
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
Kerr's futuristic police officer and police state may have seemed a bold vision of social change in the early 1990's when he was writing this novel, but there are aspects of it which have become chillingly realistic in recent years.
Kerr sets his work in the second decade of the 21st century. It is a Britain which has definitely gone hard on crime and hard on the causes of crime, with police routinely armed, long-term prisoners subjected to suspended, but conscious animation in a chemical induced coma, and the Lombroso project mapping the interior configuration of the human brain (not the bumps on the skull) to predict who is most likely to commit violent crime and therefore be in a position to offer pre-emptive treatment and surveillance.
Jake is a Chief Inspector, educated, urbane, feminist, and concerned with the murder of women. She is, however, diverted to the task of catching the man who seems to be serially killing those who have been identified as positive risks by Lombroso, a man who seems to have a sophisticated, if ironic, appreciation of philosophy ... and a very practical knowledge of computers.
What follows is a cerebral thriller in which the dissection of philosophical paradigms and the meaning of meaning within the mind of the killer become significant threads in the denouement of the novel. At times well-paced and gripping, at others somewhat overburdened by its philosophical nuances and allusions (not least in terms of occasional blocks of exposition which slow the flow), this remains a highly entertaining work ... though hardly light reading.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Good, but needed concentration
Published 3 months ago by Mrs. H. J. Mould
2.0 out of 5 stars Did not like this one
Philip Kerr wrote this thriller in 1992 and has staged a futuristic vision to his most original idea. Read more
Published 9 months ago by Toni Osborne
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliance exceeded by excellence with a dash of irony thrown in
Well, if you have or have not read Von Wittgenstein, the thing is read this book. Follow the maunderings and the meanderings of a mind which with the least bit of effort on the... Read more
Published 23 months ago by Goldie Kossow
4.0 out of 5 stars Cerebral thriller set in the near future
A cerebral thriller that was clever and intriguing, but a bit on the dry side. Having said that, the tone is appropriate. Thoroughly enjoyed the "why" rather "who" dunnit focus. Read more
Published on 6 Jun 2008 by Kaz Hill
4.0 out of 5 stars An unusual crime novel
This is not so much an on the edge of your seat crime novel; it's more an exploration of philosophical arguments set to a background of crime. Read more
Published on 10 April 2002
1.0 out of 5 stars Oh dear...
After reading this novel, I conducted my own philosophical investigation of why I bought this book in the first place. Read more
Published on 15 Mar 2002
2.0 out of 5 stars Like drawing teeth at times
The problem with writing Sci-fi set in the near future, is that when that near future looms closer, people are more inclined to pick holes in the future world predicted and... Read more
Published on 1 Jun 2001
5.0 out of 5 stars A splendidly thoughtful and imaginative read
If you really enjoy being stimulated and like having your thoughts provoked, this is for you. Set in a bleak, futuristic post-modern 2013, when many of the mysteries of the brain... Read more
Published on 12 Oct 1999
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback