A Map of All Our Failures
 
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A Map of All Our Failures

14 Oct 2012 | Format: MP3

£6.32 (VAT included if applicable)
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:52
30
2
5:08
30
3
8:00
30
4
8:32
30
5
7:52
30
6
8:54
30
7
8:50
30
8
8:38

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Product details

  • Label: Peaceville Records
  • Copyright: (c) 2012 Peaceville Records
  • Total Length: 1:03:46
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00ARD5DCA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 11,729 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Craig Brown on 19 Oct 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Ok so it is a bit early to be writing a review of this album after just a couple of play throughs but I just felt I had to. I enjoy MDB and have done for a number of years, but some albums are better than others, and from what I have read of other reviews of MDB album's I think that's an opinion that a lot of people share, although they disagree on which albums are best (it is after all a matter of taste, my personal favourites were Songs of Darkness Words of Light and The Light at the End of the World).

For me, I think this could be their best album yet. They have this time got everything spot on for me. What you get is a 5 minute track and 7 8-9 minute tracks which are beautifully crafted, dripping with creativity and storytelling. Excellently crafted music, well blended use of guitars, keys, violin which are mixed and produced exceptionally well (the sound has in the past been a little raw for my taste on occasions, this is just right). Great storytelling in the lyrics and Aaron's vocals are at their very best.

They have thrown everything into this album and it shows. It's familiar yet creative, stark yet beautiful, polished yet transparent and open. For me it's everything they do right done better.

Buy it, sit back with a beer and your headphones on and while away an hour letting this masterpiece wash over you. Don't be surprised if by the end of it you have a new favourite My Dying Bride album.

Finally for those of you not familiar with this band... they have been described as Doom Metal, Gothic Metal and various other tags but for me they write the some of the finest bitter sweet melancholy rock music you will ever hear, and they have a distinctive sound all of their own to my ears.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Johan Klovsjö on 17 Oct 2012
Format: Audio CD
Fans of My Dying Bride will feel right at home with this album, it has everything you expect and want from the masters of Doom Metal. Powerful guitar and drum combos as well as lamenting violins. The vocals are mostly Aaron Stainthorpe's classic half-spoken words, but there are some death growls too.

If you have heard the opening track "Kneel Till Doomsday" online already, it will give you a pretty accurate taste of the whole record. Compared to previous (at least more recent) albums from the band, there are parts that seem more raw and brutal here, not unlike the EP "The Barghest O Whitby" (2011). So I'd call the sound a more beastly version of "For Lies I sire" (2009), the latest full length.

The tracks that stand out are "Kneel Till Doomsday", "The Poorest Waltz", and "Hail Odysseus". I found parts of a couple of the other songs somewhat too slow and uneventful, but they grow on you after hearing them a few more times. And mostly they turn into something really interesting after a while. There are definitely some cool new melodies and sounds in these songs. But like I stated from the start, it's very familiar as MDB.

4/5
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JohnInBlack on 24 Oct 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
It is because of bands like My Dying Bride, Paradise Lost, Candlemass etc that I got into metal, the Gothic & Doom variety back in the mid 90's. My Dying Bride are not easy listening but do they know how to tell a story, paint an audio landscape and sear the heart with the melancholy of lost and abandoned love and hope. A Map Of All Our Failures does not disappoint on that score. Musically this album has a coarse edge, maybe not as polished as Lies but that does not diminish the album. There are some lovely moments of violin to layer the atmosphere and the keyboards are used to good effect. Lyrically the album is as strong as ever and the scene set by A Tapestry Scorned is up there with their best.
I must admit that I was a bit under whelmed by The Barghest O'Whitby but this album more than sets that to right. It is down to the overall strength of the album that I will refrain from naming favourite tracks; the album is a complete work and must be enjoyed as such.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By senbonzakura on 20 Oct 2012
Format: Audio CD
Doom metal is something of an acquired taste. The slowest, darkest and most gloomy form of metal is not for everyone. But for those who do enjoy the odd foray into the world of doomed lovers, despair and slow death, My Dying Bride are the undisputed kings of the genre. In fact, they are one of the very few bands who are not only sticking to the 20-odd year old doom recipe, but consistently producing the highest possible quality.

True, it's been years since their classic masterpieces were released, but they've come full circle and come back to their classic English doom roots. No gimmicks, no respite, just an hour of solid darkness and perfectly-formed melancholy.

My Dying Bride are not a band to pick up for a few minutes listening, a casual thing to pop on your ipod on the train. Sit back, dim the lights, get a glass of red wine and sink into another world of bleak poetry. A world in which star-crossed lovers follow each other to the grave, sirens lure men to watery graves, beautiful temptresses betray unwitting suitors and the bereaved waste away accompanied only by memories.

Aaron's narration is the same as ever. Only the merest hints of proper death growls break up the half-sung half-spoken narrative, as he speaks reams of grim poetry to the slowest and darkest music you can imagine. As usual with MDB, the majority of the album is hard going - sludge slow riffs, almost tediously slow drumming and Aaron's morose drone. In all honesty, I listen to MDB for the moments when they surprise you with a dual violin-guitar harmony, break into vicious death growls just for a moment, or bring out an utterly genius riff before burying it again in another 5 minutes of slow formulaic grind.

This is typical My Dying Bride.
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