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A Maid Of Constant Sorrow CD

8 customer reviews

Price: £5.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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34 new from £3.97 5 used from £2.38 3 collectible from £6.99
£5.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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A Maid Of Constant Sorrow + Original Album Series + The Very Best Of Judy Collins
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Product details

  • Audio CD (15 Oct. 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Rhino
  • ASIN: B00005OKOO
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 101,876 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By GSV3MiaC on 13 Oct. 2004
Format: Audio CD
Her first two albums had been out of print (and ludicrously expensive) until this came along. While it doesn't hold a candle to her later works, it does illustrate where she came from, and her folk singing is certainly up there with the likes of Sandy Denny, Maddy Prior, Joan Baez et. al.
I personally prefer her later works, with more original (or at least 'modern') material, however any fan will want to have these albums for completeness (and they are not =bad=, they're just not as good as her later works, IMO). If you are a fan, buy it already. If you're not, you should probably be looking elsewhere in her extensive catalogue.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 2 April 2009
Format: Audio CD
Judy's first two albums, presented here together in one magnificent package, were dominated by traditional folk songs, while the few songs of more recent vintage blend in well with the traditional songs.

The first album, Maid of constant sorrow, originally appeared in 1961. Two of the most famous songs here are Wild mountain thyme (a song of Scottish origin) and John Riley, both of which the Byrds later covered for their Fifth dimension album. Another highlight is The wars of Germany, which is actually not so much about the wars themselves but rather the bereavement caused by them. Judy feels that it illustrates the futility of wars, but the lesson is never learned as the world seems unable to stop fighting them. Many of the other songs are about Irish rebellion, reflecting the influence of Judy`s Irish father.

The second album, Golden apples of the sun, originally appeared in 1962, with tracks taken from a variety of sources. The title track is a poem (Song of the wandering Angus) originally written by W B Yeats, but later set to music. Little brown dog is a traditional song that may have originally had a political meaning, though that meaning appears to have been lost, so now it's just a fun song for children. Great selchie of Shule Skerry originates from the Orkney Islands to the north of Scotland, being about a selchie (seal-man) from as islet (Shule Skerry) there. Legend has it that the creature spent most of the time as a seal in the water, but occasionally came ashore as a man. Yeah, right. Poland is the source for Tell me who I'll marry, though I don't know how the song evolved and when it was originally translated. British folk fans should be familiar with Lark in the morning, a traditional English song still popular in folk circles.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on 8 July 2004
Format: Audio CD
This import CD reissues the first two Judy Collins albums from the early 1960s when she was singing traditional folk material with her crystal pure soprano voice accompanied by acoustic guitar. Collins had been trained as a classical pianist and when she turned to folk music she brought along the sensibilities of a classicist as she became one of the main interpreters of folk songs in the Sixties (choosing between Collins and Joan Baez as your personal favorite was the question of the day, not that you could go wrong with either selection).
"A Maid of Constant Sorrow" was released in 1961 and listening to it will surprise her fans because this is not the Judy Collins they are used to hearing. In retrospect it is clear that Collins is still learning how to use her voice to her advantage; she tends to stay more in her lower register at this point and the glorious high notes we associate with her singing is seen only in spots (e.g., "Wild Mountain Thyme"). But even in these early days there are some nice little gems, such as "The Pickilie Bush," "Tim Evans," and especially "John Riley." I especially liked her sea shanty "Sailor's Life," where her youthful enthusiasm helps carry the song along.
Her 1962 release "Golden Apples of the Sun" shows significantly more confidence as a singer. What is interesting to me is the obscurity of these traditional folk songs, although she does branch out into some other genres, such as gospel with "Twelve Gates to the City." The best tracks on this second album would be the title song, the ballad "Fannerio," and "Crow on the Cradle." Note: Spike Lee's father, Bill Lee, plays bass on this album.
These two albums are more of historical interest at this point, because you are not going to find them to be quintessential Judy Collins.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By William M. Feagin on 5 Mar. 2003
Format: Audio CD
While I have long been familiar with Judy Collins from her work in the '70s, this twofer ... was a real find ... Particularly of note are the many Irish and Scots traditional songs featured on AMOCS and GAOTS--JC's reading of "The Rising of the Moon" is a most different take from what most would be familiar with (e.g. The Dubliners and/or The Clancy Brothers), which were more rousing, on-your-feet-and-fight-for-old-Ireland versions. This one illustrates more definitely the fate of the men involved in the 1798 Rising--bitter and a tad menacing.
On the whole, very much worth checking out.
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