A Hijacking 2012

LOVEFiLM By Post

Britain’s largest choice of DVDs and Blu-rays to rent by post £7.99 per month.

Start your 30 day free trial

Existing LOVEFiLM member? Switch account

Prime and Prime Instant Video members can receive unlimited discs, two at a time, for £6.99 per month after trial.

Watch A Hijacking instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video

(57) IMDb 7.2/10
LOVEFiLM By Post

Danish thriller in which the crew of a cargo ship is held hostage by Somali pirates. After hijacking the ship, the pirates demand a ransom be paid by the firm who owns the freighter. The head of the company enters into negotiations with them while seeking advice about how best to handle the situation, but when the ransom isn't met things becomes increasingly dangerous for those on board the vessel.

Starring:
Johan Philip AsbæK, Dar Salim
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

A Hijacking

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 43 minutes
Starring Johan Philip AsbæK, Dar Salim, SøRen Malling
Director Tobias Lindholm
Genres Drama
Studio Arrow Films
Rental release 26 August 2013
Main languages Swedish, Danish
Subtitles English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 43 minutes
Starring Johan Philip AsbæK, Dar Salim, SøRen Malling
Director Tobias Lindholm
Genres Drama
Studio Arrow Films
Rental release 26 August 2013
Main languages Swedish, Danish
Subtitles English

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Charles Vasey TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 10 Mar 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Heading towards India a Danish ship is captured by Somali Pirates. The small crew is caught in a situation for which they have no training. The pirates swiftly bring in their top negotiator and the CEO of the shipping firm saddles up to negotiate the deal (backed up with his own experts). The negotiation thus becomes two dimensional: there is the key of reaching an agreed sum by haggling and engaging in the meta-game of negotiation (one does not offer too high a price too easily) and alongside this game is the trauma of crew and families as they endure their confinement. Both sides engage in a number of ruses to improve their negotiating position, but as time passes (and a lot of time passes) the CEO begins to grasp that negotiating with Japanese suppliers over a contract is not quite the same as negotiating with lives. The film is low key without the Hollywood crisis style of narrative; it is the unremitting passage of time that gets one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By M. Brookes on 16 Mar 2014
Format: Blu-ray
This film is an excellent Danish film about a Danish cargo ship that is hijacked by Somali pirates, it tells the story along two threads, the first is about the ship's crew being held hostage, in particular the ship's cook. In parallel it tells about the negotiations for the crew's release by the CEO of the corporation that owns the ship.

The strength of the film comes from the performances, across the board they are excellent. The pace of the film is slow, but it is always interesting. The interaction between the crew and the pirates is mercurial, one moment there is a sense of camaraderie, they are all waiting for the same thing. The next they are subjected to terror through violence and mock executions. At the centre of it is the ship's cook, the pirates manipulate him to aid their negotiations, he also has the most contact with them and the relationship between them is fascinating to watch.

The other thread focuses on the CEO and his negotiations with the pirate leader, these are a slow and tense process forming the backbone of the film. There's some internal politics involved and he's being advised by an expert in the field, but against the advice conducts the negotiations himself. We also catch glimpses of the families of the crew, although here the film lacked a little.

Like other fine Danish films and TV shows it's an understated film that works on the strength of its performances. There's no flash or melodrama, it's an authentic feel that unfolds at its own pace. It's an excellent film that's well worth a watch.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By godzilla78 VINE VOICE on 15 April 2013
Format: DVD
Firstly this is an amazing film. Johan Philip Asbæk plays the role of Mikkel, the ship's cook. He is the main character on board a ship which has been captured by Somalian pirates. Soren Malling is Peter, the CEO for the shipping company thus takes on the lead role in negotiations to free the crew members.

What gives the film energy is the constant switching back and forth between the ship in the Indian ocean and the corporate boardroom in Denmark. The stark contrast between the two is shocking. The ship's crew (seven in total) live in fear for their lives on a daily basis and are kept in horrible conditions with lack of the man's basic needs ie fresh air, food, toilet etc. In the meantime Peter decides to ignore the advice from his own security expert and deal with the negotiations himself rather than rely on a middleman (despite being warned that this could be a huge mistake). This is not from arrogance but more from the point that this man is driven and wants to see the crew return safely. So whilst the dialogue with Peter and Omar (the negotiator for the pirates) drags on and on over weeks and then months, the crew are reaching breaking point. And the company men play a hard bargin. Thus it becomes a war of attrition. Everyone wants to go home but until the company pay up this isn't going to happen.

We only get a small glimpse into the world of those being held captive on the ship and its not very pretty. Perhaps the biggest eye opener is the protracted negotiations from the boardroom. These scenes I enjoyed a lot more, tense, yet mens live's are being toyed with whilst those in power begin a long and drawn out process over money.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Richard Morton on 27 May 2014
Format: DVD
A Hijacking is a quality piece of Danish filmmaking (although much of the dialogue is in English). The plots fairly basic - a ship is hijacked by Somali pirates and the crew are held hostage as the pirates and their "interpreter" negotiate with the ships owners. Back on dry land, the owners treat the situation as something of a business deal, they will keep negotiating until the price drops to an acceptable level. The crew are left in squalid conditions while the deal is brokered.

Primarily we follow the ships on board cook Mikkel (Johan Philip Asbaek) and the executive leading the negotiations Peter (Soren Malling). Both actors deliver excellent performances and the acting throughout the whole film is first class. This is important as the film is more about the people than the guns they may be holding. This is no gung ho action flick, it's a measured, tense drama as the "action" unfolds over a painstakingly long period of time (for the characters, 100 minutes for the viewer).

Some of the negotiation scenes are unbearably tense as the crews wellbeing hangs in the balance and the filmmakers go for an almost documentary style realism. We're not shown the hijacking itself for example (not much of it anyway) and other developments take place off camera also, leaving things to our imagination.

Overall very good stuff. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews