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A Dictionary of Hiberno-English [Hardcover]

T.P. Dolan
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Nov 1998
A dictionary of Hiberno-English, which differs from Standard English in two ways: first, it is full of borrowings from Irish, with words or phrases imported directly or in anglicized form; and secondly, it comprises archaic words obsolete in Standard English, but still present in Irish.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Gill & Macmillan Ltd (Nov 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0717124371
  • ISBN-13: 978-0717124374
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 14.7 x 0.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,245,515 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

The Guardian Tom Paulin 'Terry Dolan's A Dictionary of Hiberno-English ... is a pioneering work of scholarship which ascertains the nature of English as it is spoken and written in Ireland. I see it as one of the foundation stones of a new civic culture in the island.' Irish News Owen Kelly '... Professor Dolan's excellent dictionary, where you find such gems as "hallion" and "at the heel of the hunt" sitting comfortably with the Irish and English origins of much of our speech, is a significant contribution. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Terence Patrick Dolan is associate professor in English in University College Dublin. A well-known broadcaster and guest lecturer, he travels extensively and is regarded as the pre-eminent academic authority on Hiberno-English. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book 29 Sep 2003
Format:Paperback
This book is an excellent book, and although it is a dictionary you can also read it page by page if you are interested in how the Irish speak English- which is certainly colourfully! Also very interesting as my granny is quoted throughout the book, so I hear a part of my childhood being spoken. Many of the words still used locally, to make a rich vibrant and wonderful form of English. Only the Irish could speak like this!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an excellent source book 20 Jun 2000
Format:Paperback
This is a must have for all students and interested parties of Irish literature. Most words here are standard in Irish speech but do not appear in other 'English' dictionaries. Sometimes the syntax of Irish speech is explained with its origins in the Irish language. Considering that Joyce's Ulysses is considered by many to be THE novel of the twentieth century this dictionary is a must to help simplify some of Joyce's [and other Irish writers'] prose.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terry Dolan's Hiberno-English 30 April 2000
By Professor Tony Crowley - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is a pioneering work which belongs on the shelf of any linguist, any student of Ireland, and anyone interested in gaining a knowledge of 'Irishness'. It is an invaluable source of knowledge and renders important insights into the state of the English language in Ireland. English, as Joyce described it, is both 'familiar and foreign' to Ireland; Terry Dolan's work demonstrates how the Irish have made what was once a colonial imposition a tool for their own use. This is a fascinating, detailed and original project, I recommend it with great enthusiasm.
5.0 out of 5 stars So, That's Why the Irish Speak English That Way 18 Aug 2013
By Karen A. Charbonneau - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I read the entire book in three days,finding it fascinating. Gaelic words that remained as English became prevalent in Ireland; English words, the meanings of which have been adapted for Irish usage; explanations of Gaelic sentence structure and how it's been retained when using English; expressions; proverbs; and quotes from novels by great Irish authors - it's all here. My original purpose in buying the book was to understand how an Irish character in a novel I'm currently writing would have spoken after coming to America. I learned so much more and was highly entertained. Recommended for anyone with a curiosity about the Irish.

Karen Charbonneau, Author
The Wolf's Sun
A Devil Singing Small
5.0 out of 5 stars A great resource 7 Nov 2011
By Foghlaimeoir - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Since I bought the book, I've found myself looking up one expression or other again and again. I've used it much more often than I expected, and I've found it to be a great resource. I had no idea how many differences there are between American English and the English spoken in Ireland! Many words from the Irish language found their way into American English, but even more (understandably) became part of the English spoken in Ireland.

The definitions, or explanations, include a fine range of examples of how the term as used by speakers in different parts of Ireland (city and countryside), and the term as it is found in works of literature and drama by Irish authors. The definitions also give, briefly, the word's source (often from Irish). I would recommend it to anyone with interest in Hiberno-English, or who is reading plays or novels by Irish authors (in English). Might be very handy for a visitor to Ireland, too!
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