A Deepness in the Sky (Zones of Thought) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.80
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in good condition and fulfilled by Amazon which means it is eligible for Amazon Prime. The book itself may have been used before but will be largely free of stains and markings. Textbooks may have slight highlighting. Corners may be slightly bent and spine may be creased but overall in solid condition with money back guarantee.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Deepness in the Sky Paperback – 13 Apr 2000

28 customer reviews

See all 14 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 13 Apr 2000
£206.15 £0.01



Product details

  • Paperback: 704 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz; New Ed edition (13 April 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857988515
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857988512
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 5 x 17.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 763,941 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Amazon Review

This hefty novel returns to the Universe of Vernor Vinge's 1973 Hugo win ner A Fire Upon the Deep--but 30,000 years earlier. It has the same sense of epic vastness despite happening mostly in one isolated solar system. Here there's a world of intelligent spider- creatures who traditionally hibernate through the "Deepest Darkness" of their strange variable sun's long "off" periods, when even the atmosphere freezes. Now science offers them an alternative. Meanwhile, attracted by spider radio transmissions, two human starfleets come exploring: merchants hoping for customers, and tyrants who want slaves. Their inevitable clash leaves only crippled remnants of both fleets, with power in the wrong hands, leading to a long wait in space until the spiders develop exploitable technology. Over the years Vinge builds compelling tension through multiple story lines and characters. In the sky, hopes of rebellion against tyranny continue despite soothing lies, brutal repression and a mental bondage that can convert people into literal tools. Down below, the engagingly sympathetic spiders have their own problems. In flashback, we see the grandiose ideals and ultimate betrayal of the merchant culture's founder, now among the human contingent and pretending to be a senile buffoon while plotting, plotting. Major revelations, ironies and payoffs follow. A powerful story in the grandest SF tradition. -- David Langford

Review

"Huge, intricate, and ingenious, with superbly realized aliens: a chilling spellbinding dramatization of the horrors of slavery and mind control."--"Kirkus Reviews "(pointer review) "A feast of imagination. As always, Vinge satisfies with richly imagined worlds and a full-flavored story."--Greg Bear "Wonderfully engaging!"--"Cleveland Plain Dealer" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 31 Jan. 2002
Format: Paperback
Unlike some of the other reviewers, I found this book almost impossible to put down - I certainly enjoyed it more than Across Realtime, and possibly more than A Fire Upon the Deep.
The storylines about the humans are all the more enthralling because these are characters you come to care about, and they're in a very sticky situation indeed. The way that the bad guys mess with their victims' minds and literally integrate them into their computer systems is chilling and memorable...
The spider-beings are another example of Vinge's greatness at inventing aliens. It's true that their society and actions are couched in human terms, but that made them all the more understandable without glossing over their alienness.
It did take a fair few pages to get me hooked, though. If you're looking for something that will grip you from page one, this might not be for you...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 27 Nov. 2001
Format: Paperback
This is another example of Vernor Vinge's imaginative exploration of alternative alien psyche, while at the same time investigating the darkness of "human" interactions and exploitation on a grand scale. I found both plots gripping to the end.
Perhaps it was a mistake to market this as related to A Fire Upon the Deep in any way; there are only tenuous cross-references and a reader hoping to "learn more" from this prequel will be disappointed. Rather, the story should be treated as an excellent - and involving - yarn in its own right.
The spider-analog aliens do have particularly human emotions. I thought that was the point. In the course of reading this you will develop genuine empathy for creatures most would find otherwise physically repugnant.
The plot follows a complex path alternating between human and spider-analog themes and the competition of rival factions within each. The crescendo is the final coming-together. Personally I found the development and conclusion highly imaginative and very rewarding.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 July 2001
Format: Paperback
I haven't yet read 'Fire upon the Deep', so I can't compare this to it, but it is certainly up there with the best full-on space operas I have ever read, e.g. Dune, The Mote In God's Eye, the Gap series. All the criticisms you can read below are true, but in fact 'Deepness' is such a strong story that it isn't brought down by any of them. Vinge drops bombshell revelations and insights to the reader far more regularly than you would think possible for such a long book. Ultimately all the tension he builds over hundreds of pages is released in one of the most wickedly scripted finales ever, with the details of every one of the huge cast of characters coming to bear on the outcome. 'Deepness' is unashamedly romantic in places but Vinge does horror just as well as fairy tale fantasy so it ends up well balanced enough. A few plot holes are just as easily forgiven. Don't miss this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 2 Mar. 1999
Format: Hardcover
I've spent the last 2 months haunting Amazon and the local bookshops waiting for this book to come out, so perhaps I had unrealistically high expectations. Don't get me wrong, it's a very good novel, but not quite what I was hoping for - I was hoping for something more techno-geek oriented, more cyberspace, AIs, Vinge's theory on the Singularity (his theory of human evolution once computers can be factored into our intellect). What it actually is, is the story of Pham Nuwen's origins and therefore is set in the Slow Zone, where technological coolness is necessarily limited (as explained in "A Fire Upon The Deep"). I didn't find it as gripping as "Across RealTime", which I couldn't put down, but there are some very cool aliens and horribly nasty villains. The plot revolves around politics, not so much around technology. So, if you're hoping for a brilliant cyber-epic then you may be disappointed; but I still consider Vernor Vinge to be one of the most talented and brilliant SF writers of our time, and his latest book (like all his others) is well worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ingmar on 8 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
(Spoiler free review, at least as far as possible)

This is a prequel to A Fire Upon the Deep, set in the days of the Qeng Ho from which Pham Nuwen rose. It's works perfectly fine as a standalone novel and in my opinion even outshines it's great predecessor.

The zones so important to the first book are merely hinted upon here, but this novel features the most fascinating and detailed description of an alien society I've read (even beating that in The Mote Series. You can't help but like the creepy looking aliens, while the humans in the story often behave at their most despicable. Other engrossing facets are the rise of a technological society, the cold war setting and the fallacy of trusting manipulated information, computer networks and "unbreakable" encryption. Not to mention the rather unique world (or solar system) in which most of the story takes place.

A book packed full of interesting concepts and characters, this is a must read for any fellow nerd.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John M. Ford TOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Jun. 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Set twenty thousand years earlier than A Fire Upon The Deep, Vernor Vinge's second book in the Zones of Thought universe shares little and requires nothing of its companion volume. It's action alternates between the inhabitants of an alien world and human observers concealed in orbit above. The Spiders have developed pre-space flight technology and struggle with the 250-year freeze-and-thaw cycle of their planet's On/Off variable star. The orbiting humans consist of two factions. The Qeng Ho have goals of trade and communication. The Emergents have the more direct agenda of conquest and domination. As the book proceeds, we watch the Spiders develop technically and socially. Simultaneously, the more advanced Emergents and Qeng Ho intrigue, fight, integrate, intrigue and fight. It all works out much better than it should.

Like Vinge's other fiction, this book is host to a number of "big ideas" that take the stage along with the actions and inactions of the characters. They include:

An alien species--the Spiders--that seems far less alien than they really should. What seems like bad writing through much of the book is given a reasonable explanation in the end. These creatures are interesting and even--heaven help me--cute.

A variable star turns on and off at regular intervals. The possible explanations are intriguing as are its effects on the evolution of life on its planets.

A tailored "mindrot" virus produces various neurological effects, including an exaggerated ability to concentrate called "Focus." The virus is both a disease and an altered state that makes workers diligent, productive and savant-like.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback