A Countess From Hong Kong 1967

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(8) IMDb 6/10
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Romantic comedy and the last film directed by Charles Chaplin. An American diplomat (Marlon Brando) is heading for Hawaii from Hong Kong in order to attempt to patch things up with his estranged wife Martha (Tippi Hedren). His trip soon becomes eventful as he finds a Russian countess, a stowaway, in his cabin. Having begged for his help, Natascha (Sophia Loren) resorts to blackmail in order to emigrate to the US.

Starring:
Sydney Chaplin, Sophia Loren
Rental Formats:
DVD

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature parental_guidance
Runtime 1 hour 43 minutes
Starring Sydney Chaplin, Sophia Loren, Tippi Hedren, Marlon Brando
Director Charlie Chaplin
Genres Comedy
Studio UNIVERSAL PICTURES UK
Rental release 7 March 2005
Main languages English

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Klec Fields on 13 Feb 2009
Format: DVD
Chaplin's last film and one I would highly recommend viewing. He takes two Hollywood stars and doesn't allow them to act as you would usually see them portrayed. He shows them in a series of comic situations that highlight the fact that these stars are only people. They can look foolish and human and this in turn helps us see the absurdity and banality of most Hollywood films. A little gem.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. Douglas Small on 8 Oct 2013
Format: DVD
This DVD is the worst. The widescreen image is chopped to 4:3--unthinkable with Chaplin's beautifully precise framing!--so despite A COUNTESS FROM HONG KONG being sort of the crystallisation of a certain classical sensibility that died with it (or, rather, whose death its disastrous reception made tangible), I'd encourage people to seek it out in its original state, however difficult that may be, rather than settle for this mutilated copy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. A. I. Ilsley on 28 April 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
one of my husband's favourite actresses so we have been collecting her films. This one is one of our favourites
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By opus on 30 April 2014
Format: DVD
Some people will like this, but was there a worse film made during the 1960s?

The script is neither funny nor plausible, Brando is wooden, Loren merely statuesque, Hedron wasted, and Sydney Chaplin not really good enough. When one observes that this film was released in the same month as Blow-Up its-out-of date-ness by two or three decades is all too apparent. I could say more.

Then there are the sets. It is not so much that they are far too large for an ocean-going liner (always assuming there were any in 1966 - before cruising got started) but the suite (where all the action happens) look shore-bound - no hint that they are on a ship and at sea, and worst of all that door-buzzer constantly going is annoying beyond endurable. The music is also lost in an earlier decade.

Then there is the question of the script - perhaps when written as apparently it was in the 1930s it would have been do-able, (intolerant Ambassador treating his staff like slaves) but under its veneer of sentimentality I found it morally fairly offensive: Pro-prostitution, pro-adultery, pro-divorce, pro fake-marriage and pro-American open-boarders (provided you are white and attractive and with an entitlement complex to boot). Not the slightest hint that Hong Kong is British either.

The only pleasing moment is when having arrived in Honolulu, Loren hitches a lift on a right-hand drive lorry - well they are, bizzarly, at Pinewood after all.
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