Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Boy at the Hogarth Press Paperback – 28 Sep 1978


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 28 Sep 1978
£38.45 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New edition edition (28 Sep 1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140048626
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140048629
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 2.5 x 12.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 818,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"This little beauty of a book holds an intriguing story . . . a delight to read, to hold and to give." --"Irish Times" --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Richard Kennedy (1910-1989) is best remembered as a popular illustrator of children's books. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. K. A. Wheatley TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 Jun 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A slender memoir by the illustrator Richard Kennedy telling of his first job working as an office boy for Leonard and Virginia Woolf at the heyday of the Hogarth Press.

Kennedy was just sixteen when he took the job and his naive and bumbling ineptitude is the making of these anecdotes. He cannot seem to do a single job without putting his foot in it and his gaucheness nestling cheek by jowl with the worldly sophistication of the Bloomsbury set is just a delight.

Kennedy has illustrated the volume with his signature pen and ink sketches and this lifts the already remarkable work right out of the ordinary.

This is a book which demands to be reprinted.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By booksetc on 1 May 2009
Format: Paperback
This is a delightful little book, and hugely amusing - what a shame it is out of print. Richard Kennedy went to work for Leonard and Virginia Woolf at the Hogarth Press when he was a gauche 16-year-old. And this is how the Bloomsbury set appeared to an unimpressed adolescent. Here is Leonard Woolf, careful with the petty cash and questioning the purchase of toilet paper for the staff. Thrown in at the conversational deep end, Richard - who has never heard of DH Lawrence - confuses him with TE. He guffaws when Vanessa Bell falls on her backside and thinks the Woolfs' country residence smells of the cesspit. Of Orlando, he says: 'I think I'm going to like it much more than To the Lighthouse, which is a good thing because it's embarrassing to like someone and not admire their work.'
Very, very funny ... and Kennedy's line drawings bring it even more vividly to life. Beware the office boy with an observant eye!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Mrs E MacGregor on 24 May 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Written by an ingenuous, eager to please sixteen year old, this book is a delight. It not only gives a written first hand view of Bloomsbury intellectuals, but is beautifully illustrated as well. The humour is in the juxtaposition of literary art and the practicalities of working in a rat infested basement, the earnest discussion of Russian authors and the smell of the cesspit at Rodmell and the striving of the sixteen year old to do the right thing and be seen to be doing the right thing.
A more subtle version of Adrian Mole.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback