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51st State (Plus) Paperback – 5 Aug 1999


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Product details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; New edition edition (5 Aug. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140275800
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140275803
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 2 x 18 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 195,478 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paul T Horgan VINE VOICE on 19 Nov. 2008
Format: Paperback
The author was editor of the UK's Guardian newspaper for two decades.

The Guardian is a left-of-centre newspaper much disposed to criticising and belittling the USA (especially Republicans) and the Tories in the UK. They also like to poke fun traditional English values in the furtherance of a politically correct agenda (it's no surprise that a good proportion of media and public sector vacancies are advertised in the Guardian). This makes it quite surprising to discover Preston writing what could be regarded a right-wing fantasy. England leaves the EU and becomes the 51st state of the USA. The PM becomes President of the USA following the demise of the incumbent.

You would expect the writing style to be better, but perhaps Preston authored this wish-fulfillment dream in this style to make it sell. It does not suffer the limited vocabulary and development of your average mass-market novel, but there is a lack of depth. This is a putdownable read and after you put it down it is easily forgettable as there is nothing too memorable apart from the premise. If you have constraints on your reading time I wouldn't pick this one up in the first place.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 28 Feb. 2000
Format: Paperback
the premise is intriguing. the story's twists and turns are great. Unfortunately, there's enough material for at least a trilogy, but Preston just churns out plot - without any writing. You want him to go a least a little into the background of his story but there's never time. I had to constantly refer to the huge character list at the front or else I'd've been lost. So near, yet so far.
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By A Customer on 18 Jan. 2000
Format: Paperback
let the book absorb you and you will appreciate everything stated in the book. it is well crafted and highly enjoyable for kids and teenagers of all ages!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Oct. 1999
Format: Hardcover
If you're not a journalist or full-time politics watcher, the jargon - and full-scale slaughter of the English language - throughout this book might well annoy you as much as it did me. To save yourself this hassle, read the summary: the UK leaves the EU on a steam-powered jingo-boat, only to sink on the rocks of economic reality. So it joins NAFTA. This is exactly the sort of thing predicted by newspaper columnists such as Andrew Marr of the Observer all the time. An interesting concept, and one worth contemplating in these Euro-phobic times, but not really subject matter for a novel.
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