Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Voyage Shop Now Shop now
Buy Used
£2.52
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Atlas Infernal (Inquisitor Czevak) Paperback – 7 Jul 2011

9 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£91.83 £0.01

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.



Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: The Black Library (7 July 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849700699
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849700696
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.5 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 223,173 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Rob Sanders is a freelance writer, who spends his nights creating dark visions for regular visitors to the 41st millennium to relive in the privacy of their own nightmares. By contrast, as Head of English at a local secondary school, he spends his days beating (not literally) the same creativity out of the next generation in order to cripple any chance of future competition. He lives off the beaten track in the small city of Lincoln, UK. His first fiction was published in Inferno! magazine.

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ClMiD on 28 April 2012
Format: Paperback
I think people are missing the trick here. "the book is confusing" "i don't understand" that is the point, saunders has managed to replicate czevak's character within the structure of the book.

I found this to be an engaging read, admittedly the beginning was slow but you come to realise it's necessary in setting the foundations for the rest of the novel.

The fact we see czevak survive to the end is a refreshing concept to the 40k world. Having read slaking dead before this, I found that Atlas Infernal left me in high spirits.

If all you want is some predictable space marine love fest then this is not the book for you. If like me you can't get enough of inquisitor novels then go ahead and read this book. You won't be let down.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JBP on 7 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Hello!

I bought "Atlas Infernal" a few months back, based on a review read on the Internet.

The main character, Czevak, is taken to the (in)famous Eldar Black Library, where he studies things "Men Were Not Meant To Know"...and escapes. Much to the delight of Ahriman, Sorceror supreme of the traitorous Thousand Sons, who wants to pry what knowledge he can from the unwilling Czevak.

The story reads like a rollecoaster ride, and I was enjoying myself all the way to the very end. By far the most of the situations are well explained and thought out, and the author, Rob Sanders, has done a sterling job of figuring out the plot. The sole grip I have with it, is when Czevak and his band of misfits, encounter a squad of Grey Knight Terminators...

The main characters remind me a lot of Sherlock Holmes and Watson, and it does so with flair.

Would I recommend this book to others? Certainly. Go read it. It is one of the best Black Library 40k books I have yet read.

Regards,
JBP
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By L. JAMES on 1 Oct. 2011
Format: Paperback
So I was considering writing a review (only because I felt so annoyed) and decided to read the other reviews and inparticular 'Matthias Bereuter "colonel-commissar" (Konstanz)'...everything they said...was EXACTLY what I thought of the book.

I absoloutly loved Rob Sanders first novel 'Redemption Corps' and highly recommend it, it was fresh, interesting, had attitude, scale and humour and just kept me guessing/wanting to know more...so much so that I waited and watched for his next novel intently. This novel however...was completely all over the place, the main character (from the cover of the book no less) was dipicted so eccentrically and sporadically that he actually just became so annoying and I just wanted to read about Klute, his apprentice.

The novel had good ideas and isn't written badly but it has two major problems, the first being an annoying main character and the second being focus...I found myself reading and asking myself 'where are we?'...'is this the future or the past again?', particularly with the main characters point of view. It's not always like this but no novel should confuse it's reader in such a way, I like to think i've got good taste in 40k books [Soulhunter/Blood Reaver/Gaunt Series/Eisenhorn etc] I keep the books I want to read again but this I finished feeling I didn't want to read again and gave to a friend.

The only reason i'm giving it 2 stars and not 1 is because I have faith in the author...please follow up on the Redemption Corps and don't write the sequel in this series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By sean on 27 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As the black library continues to expand, it is inevitable that some of the new books will seem to break the boundaries of the canon and fluff. Or at least as we readers see that canon for ourselves.

This story definitely breaks some rules for me. Do I believe a few Harlequins can bring down a squad of Deathwatch Space Marines, including a Captain, without a scratch? Nah. Do I believe 6 Grey Night Terminators, inluding a Justicar, can be reduced to mewling children by an anti-psyker artefact, and thus inflict no damage on their enemies? Nah. Did I ever think Rogue Traders made a business of swanning about the Eye of Terror looking for Chaos Artefacts to sell? Hadn't thought about it, but if I did it would not have made sense, especially during the 13th Black Crusade.

In addition to these and some other inconsistencies - in my opinion - the book takes huge advantage of the Eye of Terror to have convenient and fantastic events which support its winding plot. Personally, I prefer black library authors who use the warp only sparingly in their plots, as it is too easy a device to turn stories on their heads and save impossible situations, as happens here frequently.

That said, I felt the book was a fun read. It brings together an odd ball collection of inquisitor henchmen and sends them through lots of twists and turns through a mostly familiar 40k world.

Inquisitors on mad galaxy saving quests is a staple in the 40k genre, and this is a reasonable addition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By coldwater kayaker on 17 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm sorry but I can't agree with the other reviewer here. I've been buying and reading Warhammer books for getting on for 15 years with some great favourites - any of the Gaunts Ghosts books, the Horus Heresy (the Alpha Legion one is a great book for setting the future scene of the 40k battle with Chaos) - but this has to rank as one of the poorest I've read.

The character is like one of the old silent movie heroes who just seems to escape from every danger with more supernatural luck / interference than Inquisatorial skills and these are dangers which would have tested a whole legion of Grey Knights.

He is just not believable as a character and the placement of much of the story within the Eye of Terror just seems an excuse for creating ridiculous plot devices.

It just goes to prove that everyone sees different things in a book but for regular readers of 40k novels I'm willing to bet that this one will jar with you.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback