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Lucifer (Blake's 7) Hardcover – 31 May 2013


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Big Finish Productions Ltd (31 May 2013)
  • ISBN-10: 1781780463
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781780466
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2.7 x 21.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 435,740 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Morphaniel on 31 Aug. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Paul's writing has much improved since his earlier forays into B7 fan fiction, which I didn't get on with at all. Lucifer is a curate's egg but is, at worst, a cracking read for the committed fan. Unsurprisingly, Paul has Avon's character down and the second section, where Avon escapes from the bloody scene at the end of the BBC series is well worked through. The female characterisation throughout is strong, if rather too obviously similar to Servalan (strangely, when Servalan herself turns up she isn't drawn as well as these other characters!). The men, besides Avon, are treated as cannon fodder by their women folk and by Paul too.

There are too many anachronisms with the known B7 universe alas, for my own taste. In particular the constant references to percussive weaponry (shotguns, machine guns etc) and aircraft technology instead of space technology is rather jarring when B7 is well and truly set in a 'Star Wars' style universe. But at least Paul avoids reinventing teleport for the third time!

He does invent a post Federation war on Earth that sets up a 'Chinese' force patrolling through the universe alongside Federation remnants and Warlords. This device is used rather like a fairy godmother to get Avon out of major trouble from time to time but since Orac is buried on Gauda Prime for 99% of the book, you have to allow for some alternative fairy dust!

The closest thing to a fatal flaw in the book is Avon's relationship with Magda, which we are eventually led to believe must have lasted around 20 years but is treated by almost everyone as being a recent crush.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Vague Boy on 24 July 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Someone once said that "Star Trek V" was really set in William Shatner's own personal version of the Trek universe. Starships that don't work, the centre of the galaxy being reached in a few hours. The Romulans being involved in a treaty 20 years previously (despite nobody knowing what they looked like at that time). It was Shatner's vision of Trek, not the one we had grown up with.

Well the same can be said about "Lucifer". On TV Blake's 7 mixed high camp, space opera, sharp dialogue and a certain bleakness. This book is more about political maneuvering and strategizing. Think "Dune" rather than Terry Nation or Chris Boucher.

In fact Chris Boucher's absence is quite noticeable. There's no real wit to this book. Avon is as cynical as ever but there is not one single memorable Avon put down along the lines of:

Vila: This is stupid, Avon!
Avon: When did that ever stop us?

Vila: When you get Zen working, ask him to prescribe something for a headache, will you? I've got this shocking pain right behind the eyes.
Avon: Have you considered amputation?

Without a crew or any other really memorable characters to bounce off, Avon comes across as a bit dull. In fact the book was something of a slog to finish. Despite being written by the actor who played him, I don't think Paul really "gets" the Avon we saw on TV. This is his version and frankly, he's not as engaging a character.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Marshall on 7 Dec. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
*Amazon seem to be jumbling up all the Lucifer reviews. This is for Lucifier: Revelation*

There was a lot to like about Lucifer, in an 'it's so bad it's good' way. Unfortunately the same can't be said of the sequel. Crikey. Where to start. It's nice to see Paul Darrow writing books, but by this point the novelty has worn off and the issues in his style are clear. Most of the plot is written more in summary form, a synopsis of events that happen rather than in any immediate, exciting way. It's very, very dry.

The plot itself is... I'm not sure what the plot is, to be honest. Avon has got Orac back and is flying about the galaxy slightly aimlessly. He goes to a planet and steals some fuel rods, goes to rescue some characters before dumping them in the hands of the villains, and then goes back to the same planet to steal some more fuel rods because he didn't steal enough the first time. Meanwhile there is a never ending parade of villains double-crossing other villains, and then new villains pop up to double-cross those villains, and then more new villains pop up to double-cross THOSE villains, and I genuinely can't recall anyone's name or motivation.

There is also an assassin who the back cover really plays up, but lasts for about a page.

It is strange that there is suddenly this massive Chinese space empire that is (and apparently has always been) the rival of the Federation. There's no real explanation as to what the Quartet is (at first they are the replacement for the Federation, but then it seems practically that their holdings are a space base). Because we switch between Avon flying through space murdering people, and the top level villains betraying each other, we never really get to see what this galaxy is like and how it works.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Lee J. Neilson on 28 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The discovery that Paul Darrow had written a new Blake's 7 story which picked up after the events of the final TV episode was too exciting a prospect to resist buying.

Whilst it's great to have the man behind Avon at the helm, the story itself left me unsatisfied. 31 years now after the show ended, it didn't quite capture the feel of the show for me. The technology seemed more aligned to modern times and less futuristic and generally was more dialogue driven rather than offering a descriptive writing style (other than some gratuitous shooting depictions).

Avon is, of course, just how you remember him but there seems to be a cold, callous disregard for the rest of the crew from the show. It's only ever Blake that's referred to by name. Maybe it's the character inhabiting the author's mind.

I believe it may be being released as an audio book in the future so may translate better to that format.
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