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The Wallet of Kai Lung Paperback – 1 Apr 2001

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Product details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Borgo Press (1 April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1587152088
  • ISBN-13: 978-1587152085
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 4,270,391 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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About the Author

Ernest Bramah (20 March 1868 – 27 June 1942), born Ernest Brammah Smith, was an English author. He published 21 books and numerous short stories and features. His humorous works were ranked with Jerome K Jerome, and W.W. Jacobs, his detective stories with Conan Doyle, his politico-science fiction with H.G. Wells and his supernatural stories with Algernon Blackwood. George Orwell acknowledged that Bramah’s book What Might Have Been influenced his Nineteen Eighty-Four. Bramah created the characters Kai Lung and Max Carrados. Bramah was a recluse who did not give the public details of his personal life. He died at 74 a successful author, having a knowledge of chemistry, physics, law, philosophy, the classics, literature, the occult and ordnance, and being an expert in a branch of numismatics. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mrs. Margaret M. Hall on 5 Sept. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book never fails to amuse. It might be difficult going for modern readers, but I think well worth reading for its light wit, and the ability to make me smile. The story of the Willow Pattern is a favourite chapter.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Autolycus on 31 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Delighted to find some Ernest Bramah books on Kindle. I just love the way that this wordsmith from Weston-Super-Mare can twist Mandarin doggerel into his bizarre but excellent view on the world.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Holt on 28 May 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
What do P G Wodehouse, Damon Runyon and Ernest Bramah have in common? First, they were all extraordinary comic writers with an astonishing ability to choose exactly the right words, and the knack of perfectly matching style to plot. Second, they each manipulated language to give their characters and narrators a unique voice, entirely artificial and self-contained (Bertie Wooster's Knutspeak, Runyon's overarticulate historic-present mobsters, Bramah's wondefully elegant circumlocutions). Third, they created pocket universes for their characters to live and play in.

It's wonderful to see Bramah back in print after too many years in the wilderness. If you only buy one book this year, make it this one
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By T. Silvester on 12 July 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you want to wander in a garden of bright images read Ernest Bramah!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Roger Duffett on 17 Mar. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It is a great pity that American English has been used in reproduction from the original which is quintessentially English.
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