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30 Day Of Night: Dark Days (30 Days of Night) Paperback – 28 Aug 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: IDW Publishing; Gph edition (28 Aug. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193238216X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932382167
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 17.1 x 26.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 406,214 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J. P. de Rosnay on 31 July 2004
Format: Paperback
DARK DAYS is the sequel to 30 DAYS OF NIGHT and focuses on Stella Olemaun in the aftermath of the horrific slaughter of the citizens of Barrow. Widowed, she has moved to Los Angeles and has now written a book about what happened in Barrow. The story starts with her doing publicity for her book which instigates the action that follows. Why? Because the book is damaging for vampires: It speaks of them and divulges their secrets, but is most damaging simply because it states that they exist. Naturally the vampires don't expect all of humanity to suddenly believe in their existence and promptly hunt them down, but they fear that it will renew interest in them and that some will believe. The vampires don't want this, as humanity's ignorance to their existence is the key to their prosperity and their survival. One expects that the vampires will aim to silence her, but so does Stella... and she's prepared...
Although DARK DAYS doesn't have the focus, tension or horror of 30 DAYS OF NIGHT, it doesn't mean it isn't as good - in fact, I actually think it's better. In 30 DAYS Steve Niles had a premise and ran with it. The story was gripping and well paced and other than it being sad and scary, there wasn't much else to the book. But that's what made it good: the simplicity and the focus of it. DARK DAYS is more in-depth, it's subtler and has more of a narrative in that it's a complex story that develops through each chapter. Even though it isn't horrific, it has a chilly feel to it because we are nevertheless dealing with vampires. There is also tension, as even though we don't have the claustrophobic setting of Barrow, there is a different threat to the setting of Los Angeles, as one never knows when or from where a vampire may appear.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dr Evil TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 21 Nov. 2007
Format: Paperback
'DARK DAYS' by horror master Steve Niles begins where "30 Days of Night" finishes off. 16 months after the incident in Barrow, Alaska, survivor Stella Olemaun has written a book to tell the world about what happened in her small home town and also make everyone aware that vampires really do exist. She moves over to Los Angeles with a group of vampire killers, equipped and trained for any confrontations she may have with the blood-drinking predators. Trying to stop her on her way is Vincente's lover who is also the head of the vampires, along with the rest of the Los Angeles vampire population.

After such an excellent book that was "30 Days of Night" I thought it would be near impossible to better the brilliant vampire thriller. And although this isn't quite as good it does make a very good attempt, resulting in a hugely enjoyable and exciting sequel. The story has a lot more action in it than the first book and is just screaming to be made into a movie (which will no doubt happen soon enough). Stella's character is a lot different to the one in the original book as this time she is a lot tougher and ruthless. This is unfortunate as at points, she is a little cheesy, reminding me of Blade's comic and movie character or even Alice from the Resident Evil movies. There's also a stack of new characters (and one or two returning ones) that I hope will return in the following books.

If you've read the first book you will definitely enjoy this one as there are a lot of twists and shocks for anyone familiar to the original story. If you've not read the original it is also a great stand-alone book that can be enjoyed by complete newcomers to the series. The ending also has a massive cliffhanger so I can't wait to see what happens next in "Return to Barrow" and the new book "Eben and Stella".
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 30 Oct. 2004
Format: Paperback
if you like your art messy, your action gory and you days dark, buy this. tho i'd recommend reading 30 days of night first.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 27 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Fantastic sequel 14 May 2004
By Blake Petit - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Having only discovered Steve Niles' work a few months ago, he is rapidly becoming one of my favorite comic book creators. In "30 Days of Night," a small Alaskan town was beset by bloodthirsty vampires during a month-long period of darkness. In this series we follow one of the survivors, the wife of the sheriff who sacrificed his life to save the town, as she fights to make the world believe in the menace that destroyed her husband.
Niles has an incredible ability to take concepts as old as vampires, zombies and werewolves (in his Cal McDonald stories) and find new and intriguing angles to view them through. We get to see a woman try to convince a skeptical world that vampires are real, that they have worked for centuries to cultivate the belief that they are fiction, and that they are very dangerous. Niles doesn't go for the easy ending, either -- this is a story even more brutal than "30 Days," and one that leaves you shivering.
Ben Templesmith's artwork isn't something I'd always go for, but it fits the tone of these stories perfectly -- scattershot, disjointed... horrific, but with a strange elegance to it.
This is one of the best horror comics on the stands these days, and I can't wait for the paperback of the third book to hit the shelves.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Vampires in LA 9 Mar. 2005
By J. P. de Rosnay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
DARK DAYS is the sequel to 30 DAYS OF NIGHT and focuses on Stella Olemaun in the aftermath of the horrific slaughter of the citizens of Barrow. Widowed, she has moved to Los Angeles and has now written a book about what happened in Barrow. The story starts with her doing publicity for her book which instigates the action that follows. Why? Because the book is damaging for vampires: It speaks of them and divulges their secrets, but is most damaging simply because it states that they exist. Naturally the vampires don't expect all of humanity to suddenly believe in their existence and promptly hunt them down, but they fear that it will renew interest in them and that some will believe. The vampires don't want this, as humanity's ignorance to their existence is the key to their prosperity and their survival. One expects that the vampires will aim to silence her, but so does Stella... and she's prepared...

Although DARK DAYS doesn't have the focus, tension or horror of 30 DAYS OF NIGHT, it doesn't mean it isn't as good - in fact, I actually think it's better. In 30 DAYS Steve Niles had a premise and ran with it. The story was gripping and well paced and other than it being sad and scary, there wasn't much else to the book. But that's what made it good: the simplicity and the focus of it. DARK DAYS is more in-depth, it's subtler and has more of a narrative in that it's a complex story that develops through each chapter. Even though it isn't horrific, it has a chilly feel to it because we are nevertheless dealing with vampires. There is also tension, as even though we don't have the claustrophobic setting of Barrow, there is a different threat to the setting of Los Angeles, as one never knows when or from where a vampire may appear.

30 DAYS OF NIGHT hints at the humanism behind the vampires - that they're not all merely sadistic creatures that have a thirst for blood. DARK DAYS elaborates on this and the joy of this book is having a closer look at the vampires; each vampire has different motives, agendas and loyalties, and they don't all get along.

The artwork is again excellent and Ben Templesmith's moody, expressive, artwork complements the feel of Niles' writing and smoothly drives the story, punctuating dramatic moments with exciting illustrations that arrest the audience. He works well with the summer hues and capitalises on its incongruity, making it add to the eeriness. The climate also adds a lot to the realism, which is much of what this book is about: taking it slow and trying to make us suspend our disbelief, and to this purpose Los Angeles is a perfect setting.

Thats what makes the book so good, the fresh and realistic angle on vampires, giving the feeling that its realistic and suggesting that there could just be vampires out there. In the end, we're all familiar with the idea of hissing vampires, running about in the dark - but seeing them standing and smiling in the lazy haze of the Los Angeles summer... somehow that makes them seem rather more realistic.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A good read 14 May 2004
By William M. Marples - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I love Steve Niles work, and became interested in his stories after reading 30 Days of Night. I found Dark Days to be an excellent read, picking up the comics as they were released. Niles tells a great story revolving a survivor from Barrow trying to convince the rest of the world that vampires do exist. While character development may not be great, for a comic its good enough. Besides, most of the character development was done in 30 Days of Night, and doesnt need to be rehashed here. Templesmiths artwork, as always, is great and lends itself well to Niles storytelling. If you enjoyed the first book, I highly recommend this sequel.
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
30 Days of Night 2: Lame Days 18 Jun. 2006
By Alejandro Sosa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Unlike most people I talk to who've read '30 Days of Night', I found it neither fantastic nor horrible. It was a decent, and more importantly, a simple stroy. The setting was different, the premise original, and the characters realistic (vampires included) and compelling. Then, of course, there was the artwork: gritty, dark, expressive, and uber-modern! It's like no one had ever seen a realistic nose super-imposed over a sketchy, 2-D cartoon face before. That said, it was a fun read.

'Dark Days', however, was sheer and utter garbage; it literally took me 20 minutes to read it. I might have spent longer, had I not given up straining my eyes to discern the murky, overly-textured backgrounds, which more often than not distracted from the awful storytelling and utter lack of character development. To say this comic was 2-dimensional is, I think, crediting this book with one-too-many dimensions. I believe this might have been a movie treatment realized in comic book form (since this in no way deserves even the euphemism of 'graphic novel') The story is absurdly predictable. A group of covert vampire hunters plans to expose the vampire menace, and end their reign of terror. They are led by the beautiful but deadly Stella Olemaun, survivor of a vampire massacre where her husband lost his life defeating a powerful vampire lord. Their efforts are thwarted by the vampire lord's wife, I guess, and the entire team is slaughtered, save for the brave Stella, who is helped by a rogue vampire with a conscience. I won't spoil the ending for those masochists planning to read the book, but it's as laughable as Stella's inexplicable decision to sleep with the 'good' vampire she encounters.

That Niles/Templesmith so sloppily subvert their earlier work, by making the vicious, rabid vampires he introduced in '30 Days' suddenly seem tame and incompetent, leads me to conclude they either spent a decade or so writing, fine-tuning and re-editting 30 Days, or else that they're hacks who lucked out with a cool idea. Also, with Templesmith's mastery of Photoshop now undisputed, perhaps he might decide to use it more economically and devote a bit more time to drawing the occasional background. I do appreciate the effect of claustrophobia, the focus on the characters and such, but it has grown tedious.

As for the ending, I may be mistaken about this book's intentions, but it seems a rather blatant setup for another sequel. Somehow, I believe Niles/Templesmith won't be content with the story ending like some hackneyed Outer Limits episode.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Very good sequel 16 July 2009
By Matko Vladanovic - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It rarely happens, that I read sequel of something that was so boring and uneventful, like "30 days of night" was. But, as it happens, I have free access to most of the comic books published in my country, and this somehow ended on my table. Having nothing better to read at the moment (okay, we all know this to be a lie), I decided to give another chance to Steve Niles. Why Niles and not Templesmith? Well, I was amazed with Templesmith art in the first book of this series, as much as I was astounded with lousy writing of Niles. Templesmith managed to create an atmosphere, but Niles failed to give it some kind of meaning. Chances were that this second installment will be as bad as the first one. I'll gladly say that I was wrong.

What we have here, builds itself upon premises of the first book. But, as first book was shallow festival of slaughter and mayhem, second book is much more psychologicaly inclined. Yes, there is still brutality, yes vampires are still silly animals (well, most of them), but sense of isolation, that Steve Niles tried to accomplish within first book works much better here. Where is the difference? First book was all about attack on the city which was for thirty days enveloped in darkness. And all we were able to see was, random people killed by random monsters and few bleak characters who tried to make a stand. Here, we have a lone survivor from the first book, that isolates himself into her own paranoid world, proclaiming vengeance on entire race. And, as her fury becomes brighter, so does the neglect of authorities becomes much more evident. She is left alone on her crusade, with few payed accomplices, and entire burden falls on her. Yet, as much as it might seem, she is not blindsighted with rage, she yet yearns to escape her self-made prison, and when opportunity presents itself, she will gladly sacrifice her quest for a chance of happiness. Stated briefly like this, it becomes obvious that script is much more developed than it was in the first book.

Combining more advanced script and great art of Ben Templesmith "Dark days" became much better than its predecessor. Yet, that may not mean much. "Dark days" are far from being great comic in any sort of way, it lacks all sorts of things for that, but despite that, it is an interesting, atmospheric comic that will definitely find it's readers. If you're into vampire stories, some old school thinking about horror, than "Dark days" may be comic for you. It certainly is better place to start than "30 days of night".
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