C# 3.0 Design Patterns and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
C# 3.0 Design Patterns has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This item will be shipped from Seattle, Washington USA. Please contact us if you have any issues. Seattle Goodwill is a non-profit organization that provides free job training and basic education to our community. All the proceeds go towards our mission to help poeple be independent. Because Jobs Change Lives.
Trade in your item
Get a £2.14
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

C# 3.0 Design Patterns Paperback – 20 Dec 2007


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£26.50
£14.07 £6.68
£26.50 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • When you trade in £15 or more you’ll receive an additional £5 Amazon.co.uk Gift Card for the next time you spend £10 or more.

Frequently Bought Together

C# 3.0 Design Patterns + C# in Depth
Price For Both: £58.49

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £2.14
Trade in C# 3.0 Design Patterns for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.14, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 318 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (20 Dec. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 059652773X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596527730
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 1.8 x 23.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 568,180 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Book Description

Use the Power of C# 3.0 to Solve Real-World Problems

About the Author

Judith Bishop is a computer scientist, in Pretoria South Africa, specializing in the application of programming languages to distributed systems and web-based technologies. She is internationally known as an advocate of new technology. Her books on Java and C# have been published in six languages. She represents South Africa on IFIP TC2 on software and is a chair or member of numerous international conference committees and editorial boards.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By shinysteve on 14 Jan. 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm an IT professional currently working with C# and the .NET Framework and whose previous knowledge of Design Patterns was gained mostly from the excellent Head First Design Patterns book.

So it was with eager anticipation that I pre-ordered this book with a view to enhancing my Design Pattern knowledge while simultaneously getting acquainted with the newer (and possible lesser used) features of the C# 3.0 language.

In general, the concept of the book is sound and well structured. Each design pattern is presented by its Role (high level description), Illustration (some everyday example of how the pattern is implemented), Design (UML diagram), Example (theoretical code, practical code), Use (scenarios where the pattern may be considered) and Exercises (enhancements to Examples). New or unusual C# language features used in each pattern example code are presented in summary in sidebars when required - nice feature.

Where I feel the book does let itself down is in the examples, both the Illustrations and the example code.

For example, the illustration of the Adapter pattern (a pretty simple design pattern) involves an in depth discussion of versions of Mac processors and their subsequent replacements' compatibility with Linux and Windows. (In fact, the author is so wound up in this example that they even give a reference for further reading!).

A simpler (possibly more contrived) example could have illustrated the Adapter Pattern much better and made it easier to recall (this is where the Head First book is better); instead the illustration only shows how knowledgeable the author is about Macs etc.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Smudger on 28 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a developer working with C# 3.0 on a daily basis and so I was very excited by this book, hoping that it would give me greater insight into C# 3.0's excellent new features and some new tools in my programming toolkit, as well as more insight into design patterns and their use in designing modular, maintainable, extensible systems.

I have ploughed my way through the book, but it has taken me a while because it simply doesn't live up to expectations. The examples are not very relevant to everyday programming problems and often seem contrived and there are some annoying typos and some dubious advice (see other reviews).

Instead of this book, I would recommend a good book on design patterns and a good book on C# 3.0.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Paul N. Spencer on 4 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback
By the name suggests C# Design Patterns by Judith Bishop has been written specifically for the C# language and encompasses some of the new features of .Net 3.5 language such as Linq.
The structure of the book is separated in to 3 major sections, covering the Structural, Creational and Behavioural patterns which include examples of 23 Design patterns, with when, how and why each pattern lends itself to a specific scenario accompanied by simple UML notation. The examples have been created specifically for the .Net language and differ from some of the other less language specific examples that can be found that do not make efficient use of the .Net language. The book does offer the user a theoretical representation of the code and then attempts to apply this theory to some simple real world examples, whilst other patterns within the book expand on these previously implemented patterns, and offer a different twist on their implementation.
With this in mind, the book is easy to read and enables the user to run the examples either by coding from the book or downloading the code from the O'Reilly website. However, if trying to execute code from the book Chapter 2, the Proxy pattern theory code has an error in the code on line 61, which is different to the downloadable code from the website. Therefore, anyone with little understanding of the C# language may not be aware that this is in fact an error and not a feature of the language. In my opinion it would be beneficial to run some of the more complex examples (such as the abstract factory pattern) in the book to get an understanding of the interaction between the components, as purely reading the code may not be sufficient.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Franck Jeannin on 23 Jun. 2008
Format: Paperback
I bought this book because Eric Lippert mentioned it on his blog (he is one of the reviewers and wrote the foreword) and I'm a big fan of Eric's work. I guess reviewing a book is not the same as writing it! I started with a deep interest in both topics (C# 3.0 and design patterns) as well as (too) high expectations and I got fairly quickly disappointed by the lack of innovative ideas in the proposed implementations and the somewhat superficial use of C# 3.0.
The code lacks consistency as if it was written by different people with different level of expertise, the layout (of the code) is far from perfect with a few irritating typos. Sometimes the lengthy explanations about the implementation cover trivial matters while unnecessarily confusing bits are just taken for granted.
There is even one suggestion that made me fall from my chair, page 170 in the Chain of Responsibility and Command pattern: storing information in the numerical value of enums! What a convoluted idea for no practical benefit (apart maybe saving 4 bytes of memory) and a potential nightmare for maintenance.

Overall, all the ingredients for a good book, but you might have to wait for the second edition (if it ever gets that far) to make it worth it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback