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2312 Hardcover – 22 May 2012

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 561 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (22 May 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316098124
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316098120
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 4.4 x 24.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,769,392 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Kim Stanley Robinson has won the Hugo, Nebula and Locus awards. He is the author of over twenty previous books, including the bestselling Mars trilogy and the highly acclaimed FORTY SIGNS OF RAIN. He lives in Davis, California.

Product Description

Review

Robinson blends mystery and suspense with lyrical evocation of a complex future (SUNDAY TELEGRAPH)

Polymathic, visionary brilliance (FINANCIAL TIMES)

A capacious and marvellous future-history (GUARDIAN)

Kim Stanley Robinson is one of science fiction's greats . . . fans of the Mars books will delight in this novel; new readers will be astonished by the depth, breadth and power of Robinson's invention (SUNDAY TIMES)

A challenging, compelling masterpiece of science fiction (PUBLISHERS WEEKLY - starred review) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

2312 is a thrilling space opera and winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novel, from the bestselling author Kim Stanley Robinson --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By TheManAlive on 19 Dec. 2012
Format: Hardcover
I was a big fan of the Mars trilogy and not having revisited any of his subsequent books I started 2312 with high expectations and great enthusiasm. Quarter of the way in to the book I was beginning to hope that it would just be a late starter, but by 3/4s of the way through I knew that this would not be the case. Yes the writing is good, yes the science and universe is good, but there is simply no plot. Well, not completely, there is a semblance of a plot that could be summarised in just a paragraph or two. He doesn't really sell what plot there is, there is no tension, excitement or any emotion other than just following a couple of characters through some very bland adventures. Its as if he had a number of scenarios about terraforming or future society and needed something lose to link them together.

Would I read it again? No. Would I recommend it? No. Did I have to make myself finish it? Afraid I did, though I very nearly gave up on a few occasions and that is not something I ever do lightly. Overall, a real shame. It gets 2 stars because the future premise was good but that is it.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By C.Betts on 18 Sept. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am an occasional hard-core Sci-Fi reader so maybe I don't have the right "wiring" to fully appreciate such works. 2312 is full of well-realised technology, concepts and ideas with a stronger and more recognisable socio-politico-philosophical slant than other recent sci-fi works I have come across. However, I found the central plot a little random at times and without clear purpose for the first third of the book although there are a couple of segments that concentrate more on a plotline and allows the characters to develop and interact more constructively. I also found the sudden interspersion of the main text with lists and supposed extracts of documents to be disruptive and annoying - a literary device that feels artificially quirky and contrived. For me, this book was rather too much hard work and wasn't all that satisfying, although I appreciated the imagination and scope of the book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J Llewellyn on 1 Feb. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I had mixed feelings about 2312. On the one hand, Kim Stanley Robinson has clearly put a lot of effort into thinking up his various worlds, on the other hand, he sets them in such a lazy narrative it's difficult to really care about what happens on them from one chapter to the next.

Generally speaking, the narrative follows Swan Er Hong, a resident of Mercury's city, Terminator, as she bangs around the solar system from one mission to the next. There's a whole bunch of stuff going on; mysterious dealings involving the recently deceased leader of Mercury, unexplained attacks on people and planets, strange half-human half-computer beings flapping around everywhere, and sex, lots of sex.

But none of it really holds together very well, and I was left with the impression the author just smashed together a few different story ideas, and ended up giving none of them the full attention they deserved. Example: there's an promising parallel between a guy Swan picks up on Earth and some semi-sentient characters called Qubans (haha). It struck me there was plenty of space in 560-odd pages to explore the meaning of consciousness, and how future societies have to balance their dependency on mature AI technology. Instead, the Qubans just get naked and Swan "beats the s*** out of them". Nice.

Similarly, there's a long stretch of narrative where Swan and Wahram (another important character) have to try circumnavigating Mercury in a tunnel just under the sun-side surface. The monotony of the experience, combined with growing radiation sickness and the threat of a slow and painful death, brings out references to existentialism and the nature of mortality - big themes you'd think.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By N. Webb on 23 April 2015
Format: Paperback
This was my first taste of KSR, & what an experience it was. I can understand some of the negative reviews, especially where the plot is concerned, but if, like me, you've read a lot of Iain M Banks' stuff, then you'd not consider it comparatively to be a big problem. Essentially it turns out to be a love story, although this is far from clear until quite near the end (not dissimilar in this aspect to Jane Austen's Emma, which I've just re-read). The projected state of the Solar System in 2312 is utterly convincing, as is the future science that underpins it. This is proper 'Science-fiction' & it's where the book really excels. There are also thought provoking ideas about gender engineering, extending human longevity, AI, & preserving/re-introducing endangered animal species. The man can definitely write, & takes no prisoners with his (sometimes) challenging prose & ideas. Personally, I liked the 'Extracts' & other various interludes, but then I'm a big Jack Vance fan, & he frequently used similar techniques (see his incomparable Demon Prince series). I found myself reading 2312 in quite small chunks towards the end, as the amount of ideas & information to digest was frequently so vast, but also I didn't really want the book to end, as I found it true escapism, & a comfortable place to be. So, overall, far from perfect, but I loved it.
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