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2014: How to Survive the Next World Crisis
 
 

2014: How to Survive the Next World Crisis [Kindle Edition]

Nicholas Boyle
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Review

Extract featured--Sanford Lakoff

Product Description

Top Cambridge public intellectual argues for economic, political reform if the dire events at the opening of the 20th century are not to be repeated. A new world crisis is already looming. By the middle of Obama's second term, or of the first term of his, presumably Republican, successor, America's legacy to the 21st century will be decided. Will it be a century of climatic disaster and war? The roots of the present crisis lie in an unbalanced globalization which has failed to match economic with political integration. False models of nationhood, markets, and empires have hindered the development of global governance. These illusions in turn are part of the ideology of American exceptionalism. If human civilization is to survive the 21st century, that ideology will have to give way to a more realistic acceptance of supranational authorities, and especially of an enhanced IMF and WTO. The banking collapse of 2007-8 calls for a revived understanding of the interdependence of politics and economics. The self-images of nations have lost touch with the realities that determine our lives: it is the world order that now gives us our identity and alone can secure our collective future.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 957 KB
  • Print Length: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Continuum (8 Mar 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005033CCK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #550,055 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 'Mr. Hegel says ...' 7 Jan 2011
By Tudor
Format:Hardcover
The opening premiss of this book is timely enough: a global market, like any other, needs a measure of political control if it is to function correctly. This then raises the question - what if America's constitutional mindset is such that she cannot consent to the level of supranational commitment required of her? The critique of Jeffersonian exceptionalism that follows is all the more cogent for being in no way an anti-American rant. Some good points are made too concerning the possible use of a Tobin tax in securing the global system and the development of green technologies. Unfortunately the book runs out of steam around the mid-way point, and the last two chapters are given over to a mishmash of amateur philosophizing that is an embarrassment.
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By Khusro
Format:Hardcover
1. Professor Boyle's book ranges widely in scope, identifying the current global predicament of a world caught in a financial and economic crisis, drawing on history for precedents and guidance, and looking to philosophy for a satisfactory way out over the longer term.

2. The book argues that the present moment may be akin to once in a century crisis situations, of which 1815 and 1914 are the most recent. In the first case, that of 1815, we had the Concert of Europe and the outcome was a century of peace with Britain as the world's leading power. In the second case, that of 1914, we had a war that continued in hot and cold modes for almost 80 years, under the overarching presence and authority of the United States. This long period of war has been followed by a global financial and economic crisis that is unprecedented in its scale.

3. The book then argues that the increasing global linkages call for greater authority to be vested in global institutions, and it is in a global mode that solutions must be sought. The time for the nation state is past, and to seek a solution in purely national terms would imply protectionism and acrimony; and if history be our guide, war.

4. The one particular policy that the book discusses is to levy a Tobin tax on speculative financial transactions (which ought to reduce the possibility of future financial crises), and use the proceeds to create a more equitable and harmonious world through ambitious goals relating to reducing poverty.

5. The book draws on philosophers to explore the nature of the state, the coming of the nation state, and the concept of personal identity.
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Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fresh and profound overview of our current troubles 6 Jun 2011
By Bruce Caithness - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Nicholas Boyle is the highly respected biographer of Goethe, having completed two of the intended three volumes of Goethe, The Poet and The Age. The current book, 2014: How to Survive the Next World Crisis is a continuation of themes he explored in Who Are We Now? Christian Humanism and the Global Market from Hegel to Heaney.

Boyle is not trying to be a prophet with respect to 2014 but rather he brings an intelligent and long term historical perspective to the aftermath of the Great Financial Crash.

It is a vain hope that the world will swiftly recover from the disgraceful lapse in corporate governance combined with the accumulated result of consumers spending on the never never that tipped the economic world on its head in 2007. 40% of the world's wealth was destroyed and yet petty self interest at a national level still rears its ugly head.

The politics of simplistic self interest - the mantras of lower taxes, emotive climate change scepticism and fear of the effects of globalization will almost certainly contribute to a deeper world crisis. Such a result while unintended is not necessarily unforeseen.

Nicholas Boyle brings a sophisticated viewpoint that can assist policy makers to bring a long term and integrated perspective to the current state of the union. The character of the world in which the next two or three generations of the human race will have to live is what is at stake.

Goethe: The Poet and the Age: Volume I: The Poetry of Desire (1749-1790) (Goethe - The Poet & the Age)
Goethe: The Poet and the Age: Volume II: Revolution and Renunciation, 1790-1803 (Goethe - The Poet & the Age)
Who Are We Now?: Christian Humanism and the Global Market from Hegel to Heaney
5.0 out of 5 stars an ambitious and welcome approach to tackling the current malaise 1 Oct 2013
By Khusro - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
1. Professor Boyle's book ranges widely in scope, identifying the current global predicament of a world caught in a financial and economic crisis, drawing on history for precedents and guidance, and looking to philosophy for a satisfactory way out over the longer term.

2. The book argues that the present moment may be akin to once in a century crisis situations, of which 1815 and 1914 are the most recent. In the first case, that of 1815, we had the Concert of Europe and the outcome was a century of peace with Britain as the world's leading power. In the second case, that of 1914, we had a war that continued in hot and cold modes for almost 80 years, under the overarching presence and authority of the United States. This long period of war has been followed by a global financial and economic crisis that is unprecedented in its scale.

3. The book then argues that the increasing global linkages call for greater authority to be vested in global institutions, and it is in a global mode that solutions must be sought. The time for the nation state is past, and to seek a solution in purely national terms would imply protectionism and acrimony; and if history be our guide, war.

4. The one particular policy that the book discusses is to levy a Tobin tax on speculative financial transactions (which ought to reduce the possibility of future financial crises), and use the proceeds to create a more equitable and harmonious world through ambitious goals relating to reducing poverty.

5. The book draws on philosophers to explore the nature of the state, the coming of the nation state, and the concept of personal identity. The philosophical underpinnings of the United States as an exceptional nation created by the Almighty to do good work on His earth are shown to be open to at least some doubt. I found the discussion of the frequently used device of "the American people" by the American politicians most interesting

6. Europe, the book posits, already accepts supranational institutions in the EU. The biggest hurdle therefore to the author's proposal (in his view) is whether the United States can be brought around to this perspective, and forego its self-declared exceptionality (and I would say that one cannot see any American politician suggesting that if s/he wishes to get elected). The alternative though is continuing instability and perhaps eventual war as nation states work to achieve their best interests to the exclusion of other nation states.

7. Now there are shortcomings in the book, but I have rated it as a 5 star work because not much more was possible within the bounds of the what would be about 100 pages of a regular book (this one is a volume with small pages). The shortcomings though are not of a critical nature (eg, whether it is IMF that is best placed to do the Tobin tax, how should the governance of an international institution be structured, etc, at one level; and how would China respond to these ideas at another level) and do not violate the basic concepts and argument put forth.

8. The critical aspect for me is the broad ideas that the book brings together in one coherent whole; the shortcomings may then be seen as the further work that is required by the concepts set out in the book.

9. I have also posted this review on Amazon UK
17 of 35 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Blurb Says it All 29 Sep 2010
By JD - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
"If human civilization is to survive the 21st century, that ideology [American exceptionalism] will have to give way to a more realistic acceptance of supranational authorities, and especially of an enhanced IMF and WTO."

In other words, saving humanity requires giving the parasites of the world increased power to plunder America. Meanwhile we're going broke as it is. LOL.
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