1968: The Year that Rocked the World and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
1968: The Year that Rocke... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

1968: The Year that Rocked the World Paperback – 3 Feb 2005


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£11.99
£4.68 £0.01
£11.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

1968: The Year that Rocked the World + 1968 in Europe: A History of Protest and Activism, 1956-1977 (Palgrave Macmillan Transnational History Series) + May '68 and Its Afterlives
Price For All Three: £51.48

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; New Ed edition (3 Feb. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099429624
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099429623
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 110,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"A riveting, evocative, entertaining read." (Observer)

"Eminently readable... Will bring a flood of memories of an exceptional year in the exceptional 1960s" (The Economist)

"An expansive, explosive account" (Esquire)

"Kurlansky is a very superior journalist: diligent in his research, quirkily original in his insights, swift and clear in his storytelling. 1968 is a riveting, evocative, entertaining read" (Observer)

Book Description

‘A fascinating account… combining the rigour of the historian with the powerful emotions of someone who was a 20-year-old student at the time’ Uncut

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Thesiger on 13 Jan. 2014
Format: Paperback
A curate's egg of a book. The idea of focusing on a single year is interesting and different. But the chapters read as detached and incoherent from the whole. There's not enough time or space to join the dots properly or to present the period in the broader contextual sweep of social change. And the author is far too much in thrall to silly student posturings and is quick to swallow the taller tales of the extent of oppression by "the Man".

If you want a more readable and lively account of these same events you could do far worse than pick up the considerably better "There's a Riot Going on: Revolutionaries, Rock Stars, and the Rise and Fall of 60s Counter-culture" by Peter Doggett.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
I grew up in the sixties so the significance of the times was filtered and distorted by the day-to-day concerns of a grade school kid.

Kurlansky's "1968" puts the times into perspective. The assassinations of MLK and RFK. The Shakespearean tragedy of LBJ. Prague Spring. May '68. Student uprisings around the world. Ghetto uprisings around the country. The Democratic Convention debacle in Chicago and the inspiring hope of the Apollo program.

I remember many of these events seeping into our lives from the streets, the schools, the radio and the nightly news, but never considered just how much upheaval was packed into one amazing year.

Kurlansky helps us understand how communications and technological breakthroughs brought the world into closer focus and paved the way to the barrage of information we now live in.

This book reminds us that history often lurches two steps forward and one step back. It is well organized, well written, and well worth your time
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By S Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 5 May 2010
Format: Paperback
Mark Kurlansky has set himself the task of writing the history of 1968, a year of rock n roll n rebellions. Much of the focus of the book is on the student movements that erupted across the world, principally in France, the United States, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Mexico and Germany, though Kurlansky still finds room to deal with the Vietnam War, the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, the war in Biafra, as well as topics such as feminism, and the popular philosophy and literature of the era.

Kurlansky writes in a crisp readable prose, the sections that cover the student movements in the various countries appear to have been covered in a reasonably impartial and thorough manner, though the focus on student movements does seem to be a little overdone for a book that claims to be a history of the whole year. The perversity of this is quite clear when one considers that the actuality of the Vietnam War receives far less coverage than the anti-war movement in the United States and such coverage as there is gives little idea of the reality of that war. The troubles in Northern Ireland receive zero coverage, as does South Africa. Latin American, African, and Asian (the cultural revolution in China is graced with a few paragraphs) coverage is primarily focussed on a single country in each continent: Mexico, Biafra and Vietnam. And then there is the big problem I had with this book . . .

Ever seen the The Big Lebowski? In that brilliant film by the brothers Coen there is a character called Walter, the Big Lebowski's bowling buddy. No matter what the subject under discussion is, Walter manages to bring it back to the issue of `Nam. Kurlansky's `Nam is Zionism and Israel.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By French Film Buff on 20 Mar. 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For me the book lacked precisely what the subject should have been about: imagination. Its focus is mainly on politics (the emergence of a radical politics); especially American politics. And yet the political is, like Moses, a guide destined never to experience the true wonder of '68, which was more anti-politics and anarchist than commentators such as Kurlansky tend to acknowledge. After all, we only have to look around us to see what happened when the sixty-eighters themselves came to power and became, what, New Labour? There is a quote in one of the chapters that when the '68 generation became thirty years old, it was at least certain that they would not be working in advertising. Au contraire, mon ami. They turned out to be one of the most media-friendly (and savvy and manipulative) generations of them all.

The book is a compendium of the key historico-political movements of the time; and for this reader a very dry read because of that. The true spirit of '68, however, lies elsewhere; in May in Paris (to which only one short chapter, seemingly star-struck by Daniel Cohn-Bendit, and informative about little else, is devoted). It is for example surprising that in a book of almost 400 pages there is no mention made of Guy Debord. But that defines the approach taken; an attention to the details of historical sequence and personalities, with little time left for discussion of ideas and the winged flight of the imagination, and its refusal to land, unless life itself changes. Call it romantic, idealist, naive, surreal, whatever; the spirit of 1968 would admit to all of those and much more. But this refusal to conform and to be categorized is still the only thing which has endured, and will continue to endure, from that annus mirabilis, long after the history and the politics have faded from memory, or been romanticized and consumer-packaged out of all recognition, which amounts to much the same thing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback