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1966 CD


Price: £14.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
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£14.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Product details

  • Audio CD (23 Jan. 2012)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: Delmore
  • ASIN: B00627KBIQ
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 141,008 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
Listen  1. Reason to Believe 2:24£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Katie Cruel 2:45£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Cotton Eyed Joe 3:10£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Green Rocky Road 3:22£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Don't Make Promises 2:19£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Other Side to This Life 3:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. God Bless the Child 2:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Little Bit of Rain 2:14£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. While You're On Your Way 2:18£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. 2:19 Train 4:08£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Misery Blues 1:17£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Mole in the Ground 3:30£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Shiloh Town 2:05£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Hallelujah0:39£0.99  Buy MP3 

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Simon Turner on 22 Nov. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Just to have these recordings available to us all is a wonderful thing, but best is to go straight to the Green Rocky Road release from a few years before. On that she sounds fully engaged, where here on 1966, she isn't doing what she can with that voice, the sound quality isn't as good and her husband sings on a few, effectively neutralising her. Green Rocky Road, though, is absolutely magical, nothing short of magnificent, and certainly better than Cotton-Eyed Joe also.
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Amazon.com: 4 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
ANOTHER RELAXED SET FROM A FINE FORGOTTEN BLUES/FOLK SINGER 9 Feb. 2012
By Stuart Jefferson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
"My favorite singer in the place was Karen Dalton. Karen had a voice like Billie Holiday's, and played the guitar like Jimmy Reed and went all the way with it. I sang with her a couple of times." Bob Dylan talking about Dalton in the Cafe Wha? in "Chronicles."

"All I can say is that she sure can sing the s!*t out of the blues." Fred Neil on Karen Dalton.

Karen Dalton only released two proper albums in her "career", which pretty much disappeared without a trace. Even now one of the re-releases on CD is becoming more difficult to find new. This is the third set of unofficial recordings (recorded before her first official album) that have been released, and one of these sets is also becoming hard to find. Which points up the fact that Dalton is still not afforded the acclaim she deserves. I remember a friend of mine (who still lives up the street from me) who was into folk music back in the late 60's. He played me Dalton's first album, but at the time I was into the blues and all the new rock bands that were sprouting up seemingly every week. A girl singer playing a banjo? Forget it. Thankfully I came across her first album in later years, and heard how special it was (and is), and soon I had all of Dalton's music I could find.

Dalton has a bluesy voice, with folk and country veins running through it. She backs it up with what I can only describe as an "old timey" sound-her guitar and banjo have the sound and feel of long ago, and when it's combined with her time-worn, weary voice, the effect is beautiful. This set (about 35 minutes in length) has her paired with her estranged husband (Richard Tucker) on a few songs-"Little Bit Of Rain"-Tucker on guitar, "Don't Make Promises", "Other Side Of This Life", "Mole In The Ground", and "Shiloh Town"-all have Tucker on guitar and vocals. The relaxed feel of this set is similar to the other unofficial sets-except this has better sound. If you're new to Dalton, listen to her "official" releases first before jumping into these recordings. If you've heard (and liked) the other unofficial releases, you pretty much know what to expect. As on her other releases, there's a version of "Katie Cruel", which includes Dalton whistling, which she didn't always do during this song.

These tracks (and audiophiles may dock a "star" for the sound) were recorded in 1966 (hence the title), in a log cabin in Colorado, with no address and no running water, a place where Dalton spent much of her time. But you'll be surprised at the sound quality (which varies slightly), think good quality bootleg. Dalton and Tucker are very relaxed here on these rehearsal tunes, and are heard singing several tunes by more well known folk singers-Tim Hardin (four tunes) and Fred Neil (one song), Ma Rainey ("Misery Blues"), Billie Holiday ("God Bless The Child")-in a style that's different from the originals. There's also a number of traditional songs included. Probably the most well known tune is Hardin's "Reason To Believe", which benefits from Dalton's voice and minimal backing, or Neil's "Other Side Of This Life"-which she often liked to sing. But the traditional songs are just as good. Dalton had that certain something when she sang, that took a song to an entirely different place. Her guitar playing was on the money, and her assured banjo playing added an old timey depth to her songs.

It's a shame Dalton never played more in public, or recorded more albums. But she seemed to prefer the candlelight of her cabin to the limelight of the stage. Playing amongst friends instead of a roomful of strangers. But at least we have this unofficial set (and the others) which give a better picture of her talents-even though this is a relaxed rehearsal run-through of songs. It shows another inside look into Dalton's talent-a talent more people will hopefully hear. The booklet contains a good essay on Dalton's music, and several great photos (color and b&w), including a great head shot of Dalton and Tim Hardin singing together. The photographs add depth to this release and are a welcome addition.

I could go on about this album and Dalton-all these words for an album so short in length. But it's the music that's important, and this little gem should be near the top of this years best folk albums. It's the real deal. This album puts me in mind of people like Roscoe Holcomb-if you're unfamiliar with him, Bob Dylan said"...he is one of the best." Eric Clapton said Holcomb is his favorite country musician because of Holcomb's realism. But for me, it's because they both are authentic in their approach to their unadorned music. Some of these songs are reminiscent of The Carter Family-the sound and feel seems from an earlier age. Her music is here in a plain, straightforward manner. Dalton's recordings are a small but significant piece of the late 60's/early 70's folk movement, and shouldn't be ignored or forgotten.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Echoes from the past 6 Sept. 2012
By Alexander Lukeman - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Karen Dalton was the real deal, a genuine singer who didn't care much about what she was supposed to do to become more successful. I knew her and loved her music. I still love it, almost 50 years later. This album is not a polished, studio recording. It's salvaged from home tapes made at her cabin in Colorado,the kind of rehearsal/practice thing we all did back then. A couple of tracks also have Fred Neil on them as he and Karen begin working out a song.

You either love folk music in it's genuine forms or you don't. If you want the real thing, a sort of window into the 60s folk era, this album is for you.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Hootenanny 2 Mar. 2012
By Kevin Gallaugher - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I recently purchased this CD because I own all of Karen's other recordings. I enjoy all of them, both her 2 studio albums as well as the live and home 'field' recordings that have subsequently come to light. '1966' has ample compelling moments, such as her uniquely personal rendition of Tim Hardin's 'Reason to Believe', a beautifully conceived interpretation of 'Cotton Eyed Joe', and perennial favorite 'Katie Cruel'. This release, perhaps, is slightly less compelling than some of Karen's others, due to the informal nature in which the recordings were created (from a rehearsal in Karen's living room). The other musicians that accompany Karen on some (but not all) of these cuts do not really add anything to the quality of performance. I'd probably prefer they were not present to diminish focus from Karen. Minor quibbles aside, there is enough interest here for Dalton fans to enjoy. '2:19 Train' for instance, creates overwhelming blues aura, the likes of which few of Dalton's contemporaries (Dylan included) would have been capable. When considering most of the folk singers that came of age in that early 60's milieu, Karen might be the only one that sounds to me as if she came to this music naturally, as opposed to studying it, or from listening to and being inspired by Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music recordings. In fact, were it not for her era, Karen's recordings could easily have been included in the Smith project without seeming at all out of place! For those who do not yet own any of Karen's recordings, I recommend you start with 'Green Rocky Road', the previous release. If you like that one, then 1966 is an essential companion volume.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
how come we never hear music like this on the radio? 22 Feb. 2015
By Mr Kerry P Corker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
how come we never hear music like this on the radio? same old 50 or so "stars". led a troubled life but left a small and brilliant music legacy. i've got all her available music. i wonder if she wrote any of her own stuff and if she recorded any of it?
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