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The 1948 Cello Sonatas (Blake, Llewelyn-Jones)


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2 new from £11.00 1 used from £8.73

Product details

  • Performer: Lowri Blake
  • Composer: Myaskovsky, Elliot Carter, Francis Poulenc
  • Audio CD (5 Feb 2001)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Lowri Records
  • ASIN: B00005852R
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 726,391 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Whitaker on 4 Mar 2014
Sonata no 2. op.81 - Nikolay Myaskovsky (1881-1950)
Allegro moderato
Andante cantabile
Allegro con spirito

Sonata - Elliott Carter (born 1908)
Moderato (tempo giusto)
Vivace, molto leggiero
Adagio
Allegro

Sonata - Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)
Allegro - Tempo di Marcia
Cavatine
Ballabile
Finale

1948 - A TIME CAPSULE

A greater contrast between sonatas would be hard to find in any fragment of time, but it seems amazing to me that Nikolay Myaskovsky, Elliott Carter and Francis Poulenc should all have written cello sonatas in the same year, 1948. These three major composers, at very different stages in their lives and careers, with vastly different cultural and political backgrounds, chose the sonata as their framework with dramatically different results.

I think of these works as three conversational types. Myaskovsky's conversation is a formal, polite, refined and serious dialogue, each partner having his turn to speak. Poulenc's duettists however keep up a constant, witty banter. They never stop chatting, very fast, very fluent, and yet managing never to talk at the same time! The 'chat' is conducted largely over coffee and Pernod at a boulevard café in the heart of Paris, with city life hustling and bustling about them. Carter's two players bring a whole new concept to the art of conversation. They appear to follow quite independent thoughts and discussions, maintaining parallel conversations, cheerfully oblivious of one another at times but also astonishingly in tune with each other's wavelength.
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