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13 CD


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Amazon's Blur Store

Music

Image of album by Blur

Photos

Image of Blur

Biography

Blur are an English alternative rock band. Formed in London in 1989 as Seymour, the group consists of singer Damon Albarn, guitarist Graham Coxon, bassist Alex James and drummer Dave Rowntree. Blur's debut album Leisure (1991) incorporated the sounds of Madchester and shoegazing. Following a stylistic change—influenced by English guitar pop groups such as The Kinks, The Beatles and ... Read more in Amazon's Blur Store

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Product details

  • Audio CD (15 Mar. 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: CD
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B00000I8T8
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  Mini-Disc  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,409 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Tender
2. Bugman
3. Coffee And TV
4. Swamp Song
5. 1992
6. B.L.U.R.E.M.I
7. Battle
8. Mellow Song
9. Trailerpark
10. Caramel
11. Trimm Trabb
12. No Distance Left To Run
13. Optigan I

Product Description

Product Description

titolo13artistablur etichettaemin. dischi1data16 marzo 1999supportocd audiogenerepop e rock internazionale----1. tender listen listen 2. bugman listen listen 3. coffee & tv listen listen 4. swamp song listen listen 5. 1992 listen listen 6. b.l.u.r.e.m.i. listen listen 7. battle listen listen 8. mellow song listen listen 9. trailerpark listen listen 10. caramel listen listen 11. trimm trabb listen listen 12. no distance left to run listen listen 13. optigan 1 listen listen

Amazon.co.uk

It all begins with a music-box noise, not entirely unlike the beginning of Trumpton (you know, the kids' programme with the curiously named firemen). Welcome to yet another new identity for Blur. Gone are the caricatures of bed-and-breakfast owners and bankers, the cockernee knees-ups, football and pub laddisms. 13 is the starkest, most personal Blur album ever, going further in the direction the previous self-titled album hinted at. Dealing, for the most part, with frontman Damon Albarn's broken relationship with Elastica's Justine Frischmann, it's as if Blur have ripped their heart out and left the bloody mess for all to see. "Tender", with its repetitive cycle of a tune and gorgeous gospel choir, must surely remind you of someone special, while "No Distance Left to Run" is pure, unashamed heartbreak. Relief comes in the form of the sweet, Graham Coxon-penned "Coffee and TV" and "B.L.U.R.E.M.I", which recalls their punkier days. Oh, and "Bugman" appears to have utilised the previously untapped musical properties of a vacuum cleaner. "Country House" this is not. --Emma Johnston

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By neilb1984 on 21 April 2001
Format: Audio CD
The moment that i heard "tender" on the radio i could not wait to hear the album. When I did finally hear it, i was not dissapointed. Following on from the inspirational "Blur", "13" is simply a perfect album. The singles released from it showed the public the many different sides of Damon Alburns song writing abilities. Every song is different from the one before, and William Orbits input is imeadetely obvious. The best song on the album has to be "Trimm Trabb", because I have never before heard such a wonderfully atmosheric song, the whole song has been "composed" exceptionally well, with many different instruments being used. There is not one song that does not tantalise and engulf your ears and mind. "Bugman" is amazing aswell, with Coxon shining in this mind blowing, pumping song. A top quality album.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Dr Batman on 13 Mar. 2007
Format: Audio CD
I've read a couple of reviews for this album and I felt it need some extra input. I've also noticed when people talk about the songs on the album they tend to talk about the singles or the guitar based songs. I dont think they're what this albums about. Dont overlook the albums finest, most experimental tracks. This is not an album for blur fans, this is an album for music fans. I'm certain a lot of people have no idea how good this album is. This is a dark album, an album whos greatest moments are born out of emotional pain. Listen to 1992 and Caramel and tell me there not amazing songs. Thats it...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Simon Griffiths on 20 Mar. 2010
Format: Audio CD
I remember I got this album back in 99, as a bright eyed and naive schoolboy of 14. "Tender" and "Coffee & TV" had just been released, and I loved (and still do) these, beautiful, emotional gems. So imagine my disappointment with 13. It was noisy, abstract and...weird. For a long while it lay dormant in my collection, as I got along with other transient piffle such as The Vines and The Cooper Temple Clause (remember? no)
Well, 11 years later and Blur are, thankfully, back with us and this album just might be their finest work. As brillinat as Blur have always been as a pop band, this is a million miles away from the likes of Parklife or Modern Life Is Rubbish. Even the eponymous album that preceeded this and offered the sensational likes of "Beetlebum" and "Song 2" is no match for the sheer daring experimentalism of this album. For a pop group, Blur always were an able bunch of musicians, but this album displays some truly outstanding work from the band as a unit and as individuals, paritucularly from the always innovative Graham Coxon. In a recent interview, Coxon stated that this was the point where he really felt he'd refined his skills as a guitarist, and the results here are at times breathtaking, creating the kind of dynamic noise that might make the likes of Mogwai or the Pumpkins sit up and take notice. But perhaps most impressive is Damon Albarn's at times woeful, at times enraged songcraft. He displays an emotional depth that was only ever hinted at in their earlier work, and there are moments where his vocals take on an angelic quality that is distinctive and powerful. "Trimm Trabb" is so visceral, so unsettlingly reflective ("all those losers on the piss again...
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 21 Jun. 2000
Format: Audio CD
After a fantastic 5th album blur found the sound that thay have been looking for for ten years. Opening the album with Tender just works so well i cant think of a better song to start a better album (and if you get the chance listion to the B side all we want it shows alex james at his best). The second song could not be more differnt their hardist song to date Bugman shows how they can play nearly evey tipe of music there is. Then Graham steps up to the lead vocals to do one of the best songs of the album Coffee and TV is proply the only song on 13 that goes back to their eariy days. 1992 is a song i would never of thought to be a blur song and swamp songs sounds like their is still a lot of laughts in Damon's life after the brack up with Justin. But the two songs i like the most are Trimm Trabb and mellow song because i think that this are two songs that show that they are not running out of ideas and will be around for a long, long time.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Elliot Davies on 13 Sept. 2005
Format: Audio CD
The critics mauled it, Mogwai hated it so much that they printed a line of t-shirts that perfectly expressed their disgust, and the loyal fanbase seems to be completely divided. I have no idea why. This is quite possibly my favourite Blur album. Certainly their most accomplished. It has a fixed concept for one thing (Damon's messy breakup) and it's about as experimental as The White Album or Ok Computer. Whilst it doesn't really break any new ground sonically, it's one giant leap for Blur, and in a musical climate where regression seems to be awarded (Oasis, take a bow), one has to admire their efforts.
Like most great albums, every track stands out. However, there are three that hold that extra special place in my heart. Three that I reccommend to newbies as examples of the majesty of latter day Blur. First, the sinister punk metal thrash of Bugman that really pulls the rug from under your feet after the aptly named Tender. It's ferocious and unforgiving, making perfect use of the most stressful sounds imaginable. Quite possibly the best use of a vacuum cleaner in a song ever.
Then the sheer monolithic brilliance of Battle. Essentially, Blur trying their hand at trip hop, the sound brings to mind Portishead or DJ Shadow at their most insightful. With an ominous synth riff, crashing drums and beauitful melodic vocals, it's a gem from start to finish. Graham Coxon's guitar consumes the entire debacle in a glorious wall of sound before releasing the chaos, but by this time it's transformed into a fuzzy organ solo. Genius.
Finally, the frankly insane Caramel. It's weird, it's wonderful, it starts off sounding a lot like Animals era Pink Floyd. A cosmic prog oddyssey that breaks down under the strain of its own majesty. Then turns into a creepy Eraserhead organ suite.
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