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101 Extraordinary Investments: Curious, Unusual and Bizarre Ways to Make Money - A handbook for the adventurous collector Hardcover – 9 Nov 2009


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Harriman House Publishing (9 Nov 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1906659257
  • ISBN-13: 978-1906659257
  • Product Dimensions: 16.8 x 2.8 x 22.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 369,553 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

This fascinating book is a cornucopia of amusing or nostalgia-inducing trivia about collectables. --The Mail on Sunday

About the Author

Toby Walne is an award-winning national journalist who specialises in alternative investments. A writer for the Mail on Sunday he also regularly contributes to other newspapers and is a magazine columnist. Toby was first kicked out the office more than a decade ago and told not to return until he had a story. He has rarely been back in since. In search of adventure and stories Toby has motorcycled from John O'Groats to Lands End, visited the war zones of Afghanistan and Iraq, climbed up Mount Kenya and taken numerous trains through Swindon and Doncaster.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Bookcase on 12 Nov 2009
Format: Hardcover
Toby Walne's book is a conundrum, a book which might be serious, and might not, and may be both. There are signals, like the nostalgic illustrations, and the choice of proposed investment items (old toilets?), that suggest that the writer's tongue is firmly in his cheek. And yet the research and the figures propose that his feet are firmly on the ground. As an instruction book for financial investment the book might be a red-hot poker; but then perhaps no more than any other investment advice. Red-hot pokers, by the way, unlike feudal titles, koi carp and celebrity hair, are not suggested as an investment opportunity.

Starting from the proposal that nineteenth-century explorations were in part financed by the sale of collected curiosities, the book suggests ways that the sideways-thinking investor might adopt the mentality of the Victorian explorer in looking for investments to be found along the path less travelled. It outlines a number of items which may, just, still be obtainable through tortuous routes, and some which are probably to be found in most people's homes, if only we take the trouble to notice them. A dip into the darker waters of various online auction sites reveals that some of the less-likely objects of desire are still there to be snapped up, though I have yet to be offered a shrunken head, at least not from a reputable dealer, `prodigiously moustachioed' or otherwise.

My hunch is that we buy or keep stuff to create and refashion our own pasts, to tell us what we want to be, and where, in an ideal world, we would like to have come from. A handbook for building a collection, even virtual (or maybe especially virtual), may function as a skeleton museum in itself, and like the best museums, can turn us back to ourselves, as the question `What do I know?' becomes `How and why do I know that?' And anything that makes us look at how we know the world ultimately becomes an incentive to invest in ourselves.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ed on 11 Nov 2009
Format: Hardcover
I thought I knew a lot about investment before I read this book but I now realise I didn't. I just knew a lot about stock markets. The author opens your eyes to possibilities that you will never have realised existed. A really good read as well as an invaluable tool for the serious investor who is prepared to look beyond the more obvious opportunities.I can't wait to get my hands on a few of those comics and teddy bears!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Penny L on 7 Dec 2009
Format: Hardcover
At last, a finance book that entertains as well as informs. Why investment books need to be rather dull affairs with lots of dry statistics I do not know. A fun read but with plenty of practical advice on original money making ideas. Now looking forward to making my fortune on celebrity hair and pedigree pigs.
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